Jun 21, 2021  
2020-21 University Handbook 
    
2020-21 University Handbook

Chapter 5 - Policies Pertaining to Classroom Activities


Section 1 - Text Services

(To see who has authority to approve changes to this section, please see the Approval of Changes  page).

Section 2 - Chapter UWSP 14 Student Academic Disciplinary Procedures

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Section 3 - Advising

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Section 4 - Academic Freedom 

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Section 5 - Copyright Materials

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Section 6 - Faculty and Staff ID cards

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Section 7 - Chapter UWSP 18 Conduct on University Lands

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Section 8 - Student Credit Hour Guidelines for Tenure Management

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Section 9 - Graduate Course Policy

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Section 10 - Equal Access for Students with Disabilities

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Section 11 - Faculty-Student Policies

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Section 12 - Privacy of Student Records/Classroom Performance and Authorization to Release Information

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Section 13 - Scheduling Non-Academic Off-Campus Events/Trips

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Section 14 - Guidelines for Use of Electronic Devices in Classrooms and Laboratories

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Section 15 - Policies Pertaining to the Provision of Distance Education

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Section 16 - Academic Scheduling Policies

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Section 17 - Digital Badging

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Section 18 - Policy Governing Instructor-Authored Materials Assigned for Text Rental or Student Purchase

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CHAPTER 5 POLICIES PERTAINING TO CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES

SECTION 1 TEXT SERVICES

GENERAL INFORMATION:

Text Rental is a valuable service available to students at UWSP.  The rental system is similar to a library through which students check out most of their course books and return them at the end of the semester.  Text Rental was implemented in 1894 in an effort to make education affordable for students attending the Stevens Point Normal School.

The primary textbook usage at UWSP continues to be through Text Rental and instructors are required to use Text Rental.  See Part A for guidelines concerning Text Rental.  Under some circumstances, however, rental cannot provide the breadth and scope of texts required or recommended for a course, or a department wants majors to purchase certain texts, or other reasons exist for the purchase of some books.  As described below, these needs must be requested through the Supplemental section of the University Store.  See Part B for further information about Supplementary Materials.

Usage of texts/course materials authored by UWSP faculty must comply with all campus Text Rental guidelines.

Text Rental is the only entity on campus authorized to enter into negotiations with publishers and book suppliers concerning text rental contracts.

PART A - TEXTBOOK RENTAL

Textbook Rental is a self-supporting service financed through student text rental fees. Undergraduate students pay a per credit fee in their tuition for the rental of one textbook per course.  Graduate students are not assessed text rental fees and normally purchase their texts.  However, graduate students enrolled in slash courses (undergraduate/graduate) may rent their texts upon payment of a rental fee based on a per-credit assessment.

Textbook Rental is located within the University Store in the lower level of the Dreyfus University Center.

RENTAL GUIDELINES:
TEXTS PER COURSE

One textbook is provided for each course.  If one text will not adequately meet the needs of a course, two or more texts may be used, provided that the total cost of those texts does not exceed the average list price of a single text as determined by Text Rental for the previous academic year.

Additionally, all texts must be durable enough to be circulated repeatedly for the required duration of text adoption.

DURATION OF TEXT ADOPTION 
  • Textbooks requested for lower-division courses (100-200 level) are acquired for at least three academic years.
  • Textbooks requested for upper-division courses (300-400 level) are acquired for at least two academic years.
BOOK AVAILABILITY

The Text Rental staff will review book requests and research book availability before placing orders.  If there are any questions or issues with availability the Text Rental staff will contact the instructor and/or department prior to ordering books.

SPECIAL TOPICS COURSES

For Special Topics Courses, or for courses in which the focus alters the content from semester to semester, textbooks may be available through Text Rental provided that the textbook(s) meet(s) the texts per course and usage duration guidelines set forth above. The completed Request for Special Topics Course Textbooks and Exceptions to Text Rental Guidelines form must be submitted to, and approved by, the department chairperson and the appropriate dean before being submitted to Text Rental.

If a textbook is provided for a Special Topics Course under the above usage guidelines and the usage duration condition is not met, Text Rental will attempt to sell the textbook. However, the department will be responsible for any unrecouped costs associated with providing this textbook and subsequent failure to adhere to the usage guidelines. For the purpose of this policy, departments failing to adhere to the Special Topics Courses usage guidelines will be assessed a charge of one half of the original purchase price for each text violating the above usage guidelines.

TEXTS CONTAINING REMOVABLE MEDIA

All textbooks with removable and additional media included; i.e. CDs and DVDs, will be evaluated for compatibility and usefulness and relevance for the course by instructors. Removable media will be evaluated for usage feasibility by Text Rental staff.  Decisions regarding the handling of the removable media will be determined on an individual basis as agreed upon by the Text Rental staff. 

PROCESS OF REQUESTING TEXTS

Federal law (Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended by Public Law 110-315-Aug. 14, 2008 Section 133) requires the publication of texts and supplemental materials costs for courses and that this information is made available to students. In order to comply with this requirement, the new adoption and current inventory rental books for courses must be requested each semester via the UWSP Text Rental/Supplemental requisition system by the department chairperson or designee according to the following due dates:

  • Summer session and fall semester:
    • March 1
  • Winterim and spring semester:
    • October 1

For text requests that are submitted after the above dates, to avoid additional costs courses may be limited to using a text currently existing in Text Rental’s inventory. If no acceptable text exists, Text Rental and the instructor will work together to find the best solution.

RETURN OF RENTAL TEXTS AND REMOVABLE/ADDITIONAL MEDIA

All rental books and removable/additional media are due back by the last day of finals, or the published “late” return schedule. Books returned within three business days after the last day of the final exam period will be assessed a late fee not to exceed $10 per book. If rental materials are still not returned by the end of the third business day after the final exam period, the student’s account will be billed up to the full retail price of each item not returned.

EXCEPTIONS TO RENTAL GUIDELINES

Exceptions to the above guidelines may be granted by the Text Rental manager upon receipt of a Request for Special Topic Course Textbooks and Exceptions to Text Rental Guidelines form by the instructor that has been approved by the department chairperson and the appropriate dean.  Text Rental will provide the appropriate form upon request.

OTHER SERVICES AND INFORMATION
  • After the third full week of classes, students enrolled at UWSP may check out additional rental textbooks for reference and general use.
  • Winter/Summer break Text Rental - After the add/drop deadline, students enrolled in winter or summer classes at UWSP may check out additional rental textbooks for reference and general use.  Students not enrolled in winter or summer classes can pay a rental fee up to $10 to use a textbook between semesters.
  • Rental textbooks may be purchased at a 20% retail discount by students enrolled in a course.
  • Publishers, not bookstores, provide desk copies. Text Rental will assist faculty in the ordering of desk copies for classroom use if needed.  An instructor may check out a text, if available, from Text Rental with a UWSP PointCard (ID) and completed Instructor Textbook Loan form, until their desk copy arrives. Text Rental will provide the appropriate form upon request.
  • Reducing inventory: Texts are disposed of when no longer needed for a course (i.e. when there is a new adoption or the dormancy period of the class exceeds the duration of text adoption). Disposal may consist of selling texts to a wholesaler; if value exists, placed on sale tables for students/staff to purchase at reduced prices ($1-$5), donated, or recycled.

PART B - SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS

REQUIRED AND RECOMMENDED MATERIALS

Faculty shall observe a $75 limit (based on retail prices) on the cost of supplemental books and materials that a student is required to purchase for any one course. Exceptions to the $75 maximum may be granted by the chairperson of the instructor’s department.  Written authorization and completed Request for Special Topics Course Textbooks and Exceptions to Text Rental Guidelines form signed by the department chairperson and the appropriate dean shall accompany the request.

Items, such as the following, but not limited to, will not be furnished through Text Rental and are considered supplemental.  Except in special cases, these items must be purchased by students:

  • Atlases
  • Compact discs
  • Consumable materials
  • Course outline guides
  • Dictionaries
  • Mass market paperbacks
  • Laboratory materials
  • Music scores
  • Music staff guides
  • Supplies and other non-book materials
  • Outline maps
  • Solutions manuals
  • Workbooks
SUPPLIES AND OTHER NON-BOOK MATERIALS

Course-related supplies and non-book materials should be requested each semester by the department chairperson or designee via the University Store.  University Store staff will not assume supplies or materials are needed if they are not requested.

SUPPLEMENTAL TEXT GUIDELINES
PROCESS OF REQUESTING SUPPLEMENTAL TEXTS:

Supplemental materials are requested each semester via the online UWSP Text Rental/Supplemental requisition system by the department chairperson or designee according to the following due dates:

  • Summer session and fall semester:
    • March 1
  • Winterim and spring semester:
    • October 1
EXPEDITING REQUESTS

The University Store is not always able to hold books over from one semester to the next.  It is not safe to assume that a book is on hand because it has been used in the past.  Faculty should place book requests by the published deadlines each semester to ensure availability and affordability for students.

The following should be provided when ordering:

  • ISBN
  • Author
  • Title
  • Edition
  • Publisher
  • Price (if possible) 
  • Required or Recommended (see definitions below)
  • Sequence of usage (when more than one book is requested for a course)

When class enrollments exceed original expectations, it is the responsibility of the department to contact the University Store supplemental book staff to ensure quantities are sufficient.

QUANTITIES OF BOOKS ORDERED

Instructors can assist in making higher education affordable for students.  To help keep supplemental course books affordable the University Store supplemental book staff must be careful when ordering materials. The cost of returning overstock books each semester is significant and adds to the price of all items in the University Store, including books.  The University Store supplemental book staff orders requested book quantities based on the following guidelines:

Instructor Recommendations

Instructors and departments are encouraged to estimate the number of books needed for a course and to notify the University Store when:

  • courses are canceled
  • titles have been canceled from the syllabus
  • the instructor adds students to the course beyond the course limit
  • or if there are any questions or concerns regarding specific course texts.

Required vs. Recommended

Required books are used significantly in a course; acquisition of these books by students will be essential for their success in the course.  Readings and assignments are generally assigned out of required materials.  Recommended books are not necessarily used significantly in the course; acquisition of these books by students will serve to enhance the student’s education and understanding in this course.

  • To ensure that all students have access to required books, the University Store supplemental book staff will order required books up to the number of students enrolled in the course.  The number of books on hand at the start of the semester may be less than enrollment, due to the smaller number of required books that students have purchased historically.
  • Recommended books will be ordered in smaller quantities, or only special ordered for students as requested, due to the smaller number of recommended books that students have purchased historically.

New vs. Used

New books are purchased directly from the publisher or distributor and will have no marks of highlights in them.  In general, the University Store supplemental book staff will order workbooks and “consumable” books as new.  Used books may be purchased directly from students at the end of the semester during “Textbook Buyback.” Used books are also purchased from used book wholesale companies. Used books are generally priced at 25% less than new book price. The University Store supplemental book staff will preferentially purchase used books for each course each semester to assist students with book affordability unless the book is a single use material (i.e. workbooks).

E-books vs. Print Books

Instructors may request that the University Store stock their supplemental course books in an electronic format and if that format is available it will be offered along with the print version of the book in smaller quantities.

Book Availability and Editions

The University Store supplemental book staff will review book request and research book availability and current editions before placing orders. If there are newer editions available, or any questions or issues with availability the supplemental book staff will contact the instructor prior to ordering books.

EXTENSION COURSES

Books requested for extension courses can be entered through the UWSP Text Rental/Supplemental requisition system by the department chairperson or designee. Instructors will direct students to the University Store for mail order service, online ordering, or in-store purchase.

“TEXTBOOK BUYBACK”

Each semester the University Store offers a service to students called “Textbook Buyback” where students may be able to sell their used supplemental books to a used book wholesaler during finals week. The wholesaler pays up to 50% of new book price for books that are on the list of needed books generated by book requests submitted via the UWSP Text Rental/Supplemental requisition system. If the buyback quantity has been met, or a book is not on the list of needed books, students still may be able to sell their books to the used book wholesaler, but at a rate determined by the wholesaler.

ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDATIONS
  • Instructors are urged not to quote the price of a book in class or in syllabus. Publishers change prices of books frequently, sometimes as often as once per semester. Therefore, prices should be expected to vary between semesters.

SECTION 2 CHAPTER UWSP 14 STUDENT ACADEMIC DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES

The University of Wisconsin “Student Academic Disciplinary Procedures,” Chapter UWS 14 of the Wisconsin Administrative Code, Rules of the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System, were adopted in March 1989. Additional statements for the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point are indicated in BOLDFACE AND ITALICIZED type. These added statements, in conjunction with Chapter UWS 14, constitute Chapter UWSP 14.

UWSP 14 applies to enrolled students at the Marshfield, Stevens Point, and Wausau campuses of the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point.

UWSP 14.01 Statement of principles.

UWSP 14.02 Definitions.

UWSP 14.03 Academic misconduct subject to disciplinary action.

UWSP 14.04 Disciplinary sanctions.

UWSP 14.05 Disciplinary sanction imposed at the discretion of the instructor.

UWSP 14.06 Disciplinary sanction imposed following a report of academic misconduct by the instructor.

UWSP 14.07 Disciplinary sanction imposed following a report of academic misconduct by the investigating officer.

UWSP 14.08 Hearing.

UWSP 14.09 Appeal to the vice chancellor for academic affairs (or the vice chancellor’s designee).

UWSP 14.10 Discretionary appeal to the board of regents.

UWSP 14.11 Settlement.

UWSP 14.12 Effect of discipline within the university system.

UWSP 14.13 Right to petition for readmission.

UWSP 14.14 Investigating officer.

UWSP 14.15 Academic misconduct hearing committee: institutional option.

UWSP 14.16 Notice to students.

UWSP 14. 17 Notice to instructors.

UWSP 14.18 Consistent institutional policies.

UWSP 14.01 Statement of principles. 

The board of regents, administrators, faculty, academic staff and students of the university of Wisconsin system believe that academic honesty and integrity are fundamental to the mission of higher education and of the university of Wisconsin system.  The university has a responsibility to promote academic honesty and integrity and to develop procedures to deal effectively with instances of academic dishonesty. Students are responsible for the honest completion and representation of their work, for the appropriate citation of sources, and for respect of others’ academic endeavors.  Students who violate these standards must be confronted and must accept the consequences of their actions.

UWSP 14.02 Definitions. 

In this chapter:

  • “Academic misconduct” means an act described in UWSP 14.03.
  • “Academic misconduct hearing committee” means the committee or hearing examiner appointed pursuant to UWSP 14.15 to conduct hearings under UWSP 14.08.
  • “Chancellor” means the chancellor or designee.  The chancellor’s designee for the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point is the vice chancellor for academic affairs, who shall act on behalf of the chancellor in accordance with the provisions of this chapter.
  • “Days” means calendar days.
  • “Disciplinary file” means the record maintained by the student affairs officer responsible for student discipline.
  • “Disciplinary probation” means a status in which a student may remain enrolled in the university only upon the condition that the student complies with specified standards of conduct for a specified period of time, not to exceed 2 semesters.
  • “Disciplinary sanction” means any action listed in UWSP 14.04 taken in response to student academic misconduct.
  • “Expulsion” means termination of student status with resultant loss of all student rights and privileges.
  • “Hearing examiner” means an individual appointed by the chancellor in accordance with UWSP 14.15 for the purpose of conducting a hearing under UWSP 14.08.
  • “Institution” means any university or center, or organizational equivalent designated by the board.
  • “Instructor” means the faculty member or instructional academic staff member who has responsibility for the overall conduct of a course and ultimate responsibility for the assignment of the grade for the course.
  • “Investigating officer” means an individual, or a designee, appointed by the chancellor of each institution to carry out certain responsibilities in the course of investigations of academic misconduct under this chapter.  The investigating officer for the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point is the Dean of Students or their designee.
  • “Student” means any person who is registered for study in an institution for the academic period in which the misconduct occurred.
  • “Student affairs officer” means the dean of students or student affairs officer designated by the chancellor to carry out duties described in this chapter.  The student affairs officer for the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point is the Dean of Students or their designee.
  • “Suspension” means a loss of student status for a specified length of time, not to exceed 2 years, with resultant loss of all student rights and privileges.

UWSP 14.03 Academic misconduct subject to disciplinary action. 

  1.  Academic misconduct is an act in which a student:
  1. Seeks to claim credit for the work or efforts of another without authorization or citation;
  2. Uses unauthorized materials or fabricated data in any academic exercise;
  3. Forges or falsifies academic documents or records;
  4. Intentionally impedes or damages the academic work of others;
  5. Engages in conduct aimed at making false representation of a student’s academic performance; or
  6. Assists other students in any of these acts.
  1. Examples of academic misconduct include, but are not limited to: cheating on an examination; collaborating with others in work to be presented, contrary to the stated rules of the course; submitting a paper or assignment as one’s own work when a part or all of the paper or assignment is the work of another; submitting a paper or assignment that contains ideas or research of others without appropriately identifying the sources of those ideas; stealing examinations or course materials; submitting, if contrary to the rules of a course, work previously presented in another course; tampering with the laboratory experiment or computer program of another student; knowingly and intentionally assisting another student in any of the above, including assistance in an arrangement whereby any work, classroom performance, examination or other activity is submitted or performed by a person other than the student under whose name the work is submitted or performed.

UWSP 14.04 Disciplinary sanctions. 

  1. The following are the disciplinary sanctions that may be imposed for academic misconduct in accordance with the procedures of UWSP 14.05, 14.06 or 14.07:
  1. An oral reprimand;
  2. A written reprimand presented only to the student;
  3. An assignment to repeat the work, to be graded on its merits;
  4. A lower or failing grade on the particular assignment or test;
  5. A lower grade in the course;
  6. A failing grade in the course;
  7. Removal of the student from the course in progress;
  8. A written reprimand to be included in the student’s disciplinary file;
  9. Disciplinary probation; or
  10. Suspension or expulsion from the university.
  1. One or more of the disciplinary sanctions listed in sub. (1) may be imposed for an incident of academic misconduct.

UWSP 14.05 Disciplinary sanction imposed at the discretion of the instructor. 

  1. Where an instructor concludes that a student enrolled in one of the instructor’s courses has engaged in academic misconduct in the course, the instructor for that course may impose one or more of the following disciplinary sanctions, as listed under UWSP 14.04 (1)(a) through (c):
  1. An oral reprimand;
  2. A written reprimand presented only to the student; or
  3. An assignment to repeat the work, to be graded on its merits.
  1. No disciplinary sanction may be imposed under this section unless the instructor promptly offers to discuss the matter with the student.  At this time the instructor shall proceed under the provisions of s. UWSP 14.06(1). The purpose of this discussion is to permit the instructor to review with the student the bases for the instructor’s belief that the student engaged in academic misconduct, and to afford the student an opportunity to respond.
  1. A student who receives a disciplinary sanction under this section has the right to a hearing before the academic misconduct hearing committee under UWSP 14.08 to contest the determination that academic misconduct occurred, or the disciplinary sanction imposed, or both. If the student desires such a hearing, they must file a written request via email with the Dean of Students within 10 days of imposition of the disciplinary sanction by the instructor.

UWSP 14.06 Disciplinary sanction imposed following a report of academic misconduct by the instructor. 

Where an instructor believes that a student enrolled in one of the instructor’s courses has engaged in academic misconduct and the sanctions listed under UWSP 14.04 (1)(a) through (c) are inadequate or inappropriate, the instructor may proceed in accordance with this section to impose, subject to hearing rights in UWSP 14.08, one or more of the disciplinary sanctions listed under UWSP 14.04 (1)(d) through (h).

  1. Conference with student.  When an instructor concludes that proceedings under this section are warranted, the instructor shall promptly offer to discuss the matter with the student. The purpose of this discussion is to permit the instructor to review with the student the bases for the instructor’s belief that the student engaged in academic misconduct, and to afford the student an opportunity to respond.
  1. The instructor shall inform the student in writing (email) of the alleged misconduct and of the facts on which the allegations are based.  The student shall also be informed of the date, time, and place of the initial conference.  The written notification shall
  1. inform the student that they may be accompanied by a support person of their choice;
  2. inform the student that the student’s failure to attend the conference will not stop the instructor from taking appropriate action on the basis of information; and
  3. include a copy of UWSP 14 and the institutional procedures adopted to implement this section.
  1. Determination by the instructor that no academic misconduct occurred.  If, as a result of a discussion under sub. (1), the instructor determines that academic misconduct did not in fact occur or that no disciplinary sanction is warranted under the circumstances, the matter will be considered resolved without the necessity for further action or a written report. The instructor shall inform the student of this outcome in writing. The outcome letter shall be delivered personally to the student, emailed to the student’s UWSP email account, or mailed to the student by regular first class United States mail at their current address, as maintained at the institution. In addition, a copy of the outcome letter shall be provided to the Office of the Dean of Students.
  2. Process following determination by the instructor that academic misconduct occurred.
  1. If, as a result of a discussion under sub. (1), the instructor determines that academic misconduct did occur and that one or more of the disciplinary sanctions listed under UWSP 14.04 (1)(a) through (h) should be recommended, the instructor shall prepare a written report in the form of an outcome letter, so informing the student, which shall contain the following:
  1. A description of the misconduct;
  2. Specification of the sanction recommended;
  3. Notice of the student’s right to request a hearing before the academic misconduct hearing committee or a hearing examiner; and
  4. A copy of UWSP 14.
  1. The written report shall be delivered personally to the student or be emailed or mailed to the student by regular first class United States mail at the student’s current address, as maintained at the institution.  In addition, copies of the report shall be provided to the Dean of Students or their designee and to others authorized by institutional procedures.
  2.  A student who receives a written report under this section has the right to a hearing before the academic misconduct hearing committee or a hearing examiner under UWSP 14.08 to contest the determination that academic misconduct occurred, or the choice of disciplinary sanction, or both.  If the student desires the hearing before the academic misconduct hearing committee or examiner, the student must file a written request with the Dean of Students or their designee within 10 days of personal delivery or mailing of the written report.  If the student does not request a hearing within this period, the determination of academic misconduct shall be regarded as final, and the disciplinary sanction recommended shall be imposed.
  1. Process following determination by the instructor that disciplinary probation, suspension or expulsion may be warranted.
  1. If, as a result of a discussion under sub. (1), the instructor determines that academic misconduct did occur and that disciplinary probation, suspension or expulsion under UWSP 14.04(1)(i) or (j) should be recommended, the instructor shall provide a written report to the investigating officer and to the student, which shall contain the following:
  1. A description of the misconduct; and
  2. Specification of the sanction recommended.
  1. Upon receipt of a report under this subsection, the investigating officer may proceed, in accordance with UWSP 14.07, to impose a disciplinary sanction.
  2. If an instructor chooses to proceed under the provisions of UWSP 14.07 any sanctions shall become recommendations to the investigating officer. 

UWSP 14.07 Disciplinary sanction imposed following a report of academic misconduct by the investigating officer. 

The investigating officer may proceed in accordance with this section to impose, subject to hearing and appeal rights, one or more of the disciplinary sanctions listed in UWSP 14.04 (1)(g) through (j).

  1. Authority of investigating officer.  The investigating officer may proceed in accordance with this section when they receive information that a student at the institution has engaged in alleged academic misconduct and:
  1. Some or all of the alleged academic misconduct occurred outside the scope of any course for which the involved student is currently registered;
  2. The involved student has previously engaged in academic misconduct subject to the disciplinary sanctions listed in UWSP 14.04 (1)(d) through (j);
  3. The alleged misconduct would, if proved to have occurred, warrant a sanction of disciplinary probation, suspension or expulsion; or
  4. The instructor in the course is unable to proceed.
  1. Conference with student.  When the investigating officer concludes that proceedings under this section are warranted, they shall promptly offer to discuss the matter with the student.  The purpose of this discussion is to permit the investigating officer to review with the student the bases for the investigating officer’s belief that the student engaged in academic misconduct, and to afford the student an opportunity to respond.  Reasonably in advance of the conference, the investigating officer shall inform the student in writing of the alleged misconduct, the facts or conduct on which the allegations are based, and the penalties which may possibly be recommended.  The written notification shall also:
  1. inform the student of the date, time, and place of the conference;
  2. inform the student that the student may be accompanied by a person of the student’s choice, including legal counsel, at the student’s own expense;
  3. inform the student that the student’s failure to attend the conference will not stop the investigating officer from taking appropriate action based on the available information; and
  4. include a copy of UWSP 14 and the institutional procedures adopted to implement this section.
  1. Conference with instructor.  An investigating officer proceeding under this section shall discuss the matter with an involved instructor.  This discussion may occur either before or after the conference with the student; normally, however, the conference with the instructor shall occur before the conference with the student.  It may include consultation with the instructor on the facts underlying the alleged academic misconduct and on the propriety of the recommended sanction.
  2. Determination by the investigating officer that no academic misconduct occurred.  If, as a result of discussions under subs. (2) and (3), the investigating officer determines that academic misconduct did not in fact occur or that no disciplinary sanction is warranted under the circumstances, the matter will be considered resolved without the necessity for further action or a written report. The investigating officer shall inform the student and the instructor of this outcome in writing. The outcome letter shall be delivered personally to the student, emailed to the student’s UWSP email account, or mailed to the student by regular first class United States mail at their current address, as maintained at the institution. In addition, a copy of the outcome letter shall be provided to the Office of the Dean of Students.
  3. Process following determination by the investigating officer that academic misconduct occurred.
  1. If, as a result of discussions under subs. (2) and (3), the investigating officer determines that academic misconduct did occur and that one or more of the disciplinary sanctions listed under UWSP 14.04 (1)(g) through (j) should be recommended, the investigating officer shall prepare a written report in the form of an outcome letter, so informing the student, which shall contain the following:
  1. A description of the misconduct;
  2. Specification of the sanction recommended;
  3. Notice of the student’s right to a hearing before the academic misconduct hearing committee or examiner; and
  4. A copy of UWSP 14.
  1. The written report shall be delivered personally to the student or emailed or mailed to the student by regular first class United States mail at the student’s current address, as maintained at the institution.  In addition, a copy of the report shall be provided to the instructor and to the Dean of Students or their designee.
  2. A student who receives a written report under this section has the right to a hearing before the academic misconduct hearing committee under UWSP 14.08 or a hearing examiner to contest the determination that academic misconduct occurred, or the choice of disciplinary sanction, or both.
  1. Except in cases where the disciplinary sanction recommended is disciplinary probation, suspension or expulsion, if the student desires the hearing before the academic misconduct hearing committee, the student must file a written request with the Dean of Students or their designee within 10 days of personal delivery or mailing of the written report. If the student does not request a hearing within this period, the determination of academic misconduct shall be regarded as final, and the disciplinary sanction recommended shall be imposed.
  2. In cases where the disciplinary sanction recommended is disciplinary probation, suspension or expulsion, the Dean of Students Office shall, upon receipt of the written report under par. (b), proceed under UWSP 14.08 to schedule a hearing on the matter. The purpose of the hearing shall be to review the determination that academic misconduct occurred and the disciplinary sanction recommended.  A hearing will be conducted unless the student waives, in writing, the right to such a hearing.

UWSP 14.08 Hearing. 

  1. If a student requests a hearing, or a hearing is required to be scheduled under UWSP 14.07 (5)(c) 2, the Dean of Students or their designee shall take the necessary steps to convene the academic misconduct hearing committee or examiner and shall schedule the hearing within 10 days of receipt of the request or written report, unless a different time period is mutually agreed upon by the student, instructor or investigating officer, and the members of the hearing committee. The student will be contacted by the Dean of Students to determine the student’s choice of hearing options.
  2. Reasonably in advance of the hearing (no less than 5 days), the committee or examiner shall obtain from the instructor or investigating officer, in writing, a full explanation of the facts upon which the determination of misconduct was based, and shall provide written notice of the date, time, and place of the hearing; a copy of the instructor’s explanation; and a copy of chapter UWSP 14 to the student.
  3. The hearing before the academic misconduct hearing committee shall be conducted in accordance with the following requirements:
  1. The student shall have the right to question adverse witnesses, the right to present evidence and witnesses, and to be heard in their own behalf, and the right to be accompanied by a representative of their choice, including legal counsel, at their own expense. 
  2. The hearing committee or hearing examiner shall not be bound by common law or statutory rules of evidence and may admit evidence having reasonable probative value, but shall exclude immaterial, irrelevant, or unduly repetitious testimony, and shall give effect to recognized legal privileges.
  3. The hearing committee or hearing examiner shall make a record of the hearing.  The record shall include a verbatim record of the testimony, which may be a sound recording, and a file of the exhibits offered at the hearing.  Any party to the hearing may obtain copies of the record at his or her own expense.  Upon a showing of indigence and legal need, a party may be provided a copy of the verbatim record of the testimony without charge.
  4. The hearing committee or hearing examiner shall prepare written findings of fact and a written statement of its decision based upon the record of the hearing.
  5. The hearing committee or hearing examiner may find academic misconduct and impose a sanction of suspension or expulsion only if the proof of such misconduct is clear and convincing.  In other cases, a finding of misconduct must be based on a preponderance of the credible evidence.
  6. The committee or examiner may impose a disciplinary sanction that differs from the recommendation of the instructor or investigating officer.
  7. The instructor or the investigating officer or both may be witnesses at the hearing conducted by the committee or examiner, but do not have responsibility for conducting the hearing.
  8. The decision of the hearing committee or hearing examiner shall be prepared within 14 days of the hearing and served upon the student either by personal delivery or email or by first class United States mail and shall become final within 10 days of service, unless an appeal is taken under UWSP 14.09A copy of the decision shall be sent to the Dean of Students or their designee.

UWSP 14.09 Appeal to the vice chancellor for academic affairs (or the vice chancellor’s designee). 

  1. Where the sanction prescribed by the hearing committee is suspension or expulsion, the student may appeal to the vice chancellor for academic affairs or their designee to review the decision of the hearing committee on the record.  In such a case, the vice chancellor for academic affairs shall sustain the decision of the academic misconduct hearing committee unless the vice chancellor for academic affairs or their designee finds:
  1. the evidence of record does not support the findings and recommendations of the hearing committee or hearing examiner;
  2. established procedures were not followed by the academic misconduct hearing committee or hearing examiner and material prejudice to the student resulted; or
  3. the decision was based on factors proscribed by state or federal law regarding equal educational opportunities.
  1. If the vice chancellor or their designee makes a finding under sub. (1), the vice chancellor or their designee may remand the matter for consideration by a different hearing committee or hearing examiner, or, in the alternative, may invoke an appropriate remedy of their own.

UWSP 14.10 Discretionary appeal to the board of regents. 

Institutional decisions under UWSP 14.05 through 14.09 shall be final, except that the board of regents may, at its discretion, grant a review upon the record.

UWSP 14.11 Settlement. 

The procedures set forth in this chapter do not preclude a student from agreeing that academic misconduct occurred and to the imposition of a sanction, after proper notice has been given.  Any such agreement shall be reduced to writing which, when signed by the student and either the instructor involved, the Dean of Students or their designee, or the vice chancellor for academic affairs, as appropriate, shall conclude the case.  Required written reports, however, may not be waived.

UWSP 14.12 Effect of discipline within the university system. 

Suspension or expulsion shall be system-wide in effect.

  1. A student who is suspended or expelled from one institution in the university of Wisconsin system may not enroll in another institution in the system unless the suspension has expired by its own terms or one year has elapsed after the student has been suspended or expelled.
  2. Upon completion of a suspension period, a student may re-enroll in the institution which suspended him or her as if no suspension had been imposed.

UWSP 14.13 Right to petition for readmission. 

A student who has been expelled may petition for readmission, and a student who has been suspended may petition for readmission prior to the expiration of the suspension period.  The petition for readmission must be in writing and directed to the chancellor of the institution from which the student was suspended or expelled.  The petition may not be filed before the expiration of one year from the date of the final determination in expulsion cases, or before the expiration of one-half of the suspension period in suspension cases.  The vice chancellor for academic affairs shall, after consultation with elected representatives of the faculty, academic staff, and students, adopt procedures for determining whether such petitions will be granted or denied.

UWSP 14.14 Investigating officer. 

The chancellor, in consultation with faculty, academic staff, and student representatives, shall designate an investigating officer or officers for student academic misconduct.  The investigating officer for the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point is the Dean of Students or their designee.  The investigating officer shall have responsibility for investigating student academic misconduct and initiating procedures for academic misconduct under UWSP 14.07.  An investigating officer may also serve on the academic misconduct hearing committee or as a hearing examiner for a case, if they have not otherwise been involved in the matter.

UWSP 14.15 Academic misconduct hearing committee: institutional option. 

The chancellor, in consultation with faculty, academic staff, and student representatives, shall adopt policies providing for the establishment of a student academic misconduct hearing committee or designation of a hearing examiner to fulfill the responsibilities of the academic misconduct hearing committee in this chapter.

A student academic misconduct hearing committee shall consist of at least 3 persons, including a student or students appointed by the Student Government Association, and the presiding officer shall be appointed by the chancellor, with one other faculty or staff member both appointed by the Office of the Dean of Students.  The presiding officer and at least one other member shall constitute a quorum at any hearing held pursuant to due notice.

  1.  A hearing examiner shall be selected by the vice chancellor for student affairs from the faculty and staff of the institution.

UWSP 14.16 Notice to students. 

Each institution shall publish and make freely available to students copies of chapter UWSP 14 and any institutional policies implementing UWSP 14.  Copies of this chapter, as amended, and copies of the University of Wisconsin system administrative code, rules of the board of regents of the University of Wisconsin system, are available to UWSP students and can be found here.

UWSP 14.17 Notice to instructors. 

Each institution shall adopt procedures to ensure that instructors are familiar with these policies. Each institution shall provide instructors with copies of chapter UWSP 14 and any institutional policies implementing UWSP 14 upon employment with the university, and each department chair shall be provided such copies upon assuming the duties of the chair.  At UWSP, notification shall be provided to new instructors and to department chairpersons that these materials are available on the campus computer network.

UWSP 14.18 Consistent institutional policies. 

Each institution is authorized to adopt policies consistent with this chapter.  A copy of such policies shall be filed with the board of regents and the university of Wisconsin system office of academic affairs.

 

SECTION 3 ADVISING

ADVISING POLICY

OVERSIGHT AUTHORITY

The Academic Affairs Committee shall retain oversight authority for academic advising.

RESPONSIBILITIES IN THE ADVISING PROCESS.
Students’ Responsibilities. 

Students are responsible for

  • determining a course of study that satisfies the requirements defined for the appropriate degree in the UWSP catalog;
  • scheduling and appearing promptly for appointments with the adviser when necessary (at least once each semester);
  • preparing for an advising session by having the necessary forms available and a list of questions and courses (and alternatives) needed;
  • being knowledgeable about policies, procedures, and requirements as published;
  • being prepared to discuss personal values and goals as they relate to academic and career-related needs;
  • following through with appropriate action after the advising meeting; and
  • accepting responsibility for the academic decisions to be made.
Advisers’ Responsibilities. 

Faculty and academic staff who serve as advisers are responsible for

  • providing timely and accurate advising on academic and career matters;
  • making advising readily available;
  • maintaining necessary files on advisees for monitoring progress toward advisee’s educational goals;
  • conveying information on academic requirements, policies, and procedures;
  • assisting the student in identifying and pursuing educational goals and objectives and in securing information about career opportunities;
  • helping the student to examine course offerings in the major, and relate these to courses in the student’s broader field of study; and understand the graduation requirements for the chosen curriculum.
  • tailoring the advising approach to individual students and making referrals appropriate to their needs and interests;
  • being responsive to discussions of students’ personal values and goals as they relate to academic and career-related needs; and
  • being sensitive to issues relating to the student’s retention at UWSP, and making appropriate referrals when necessary/possible.

DELIVERING ADVISING SERVICES.

Academic and Career Advising Center

The Academic and Career Advising Center (ACAC) will advise all incoming freshmen for three semesters and all incoming transfer students for one semester. Each student will be assigned a professional academic and career adviser to assist the student in the student’s transition to the university, and to help the student identify educational and professional goals and to offer guidance to the student on ways to reach those individualized goals. Students will be transitioned to a professional or faculty adviser within their program of study after the third semester for freshmen and after one semester for transfer students.

Students are encouraged at any time to seek guidance and mentorship from multiple sources on campus.

Assists Departments.

The ACAC shall assist departments and other functional equivalent units in establishing and maintaining effective advising programs and in the assessment of academic advising.

Distribution of New Information.

The Director of Academic and Career Advising shall have responsibility for distributing information to faculty advisers about changes in academic policies and procedures related to advising that do not yet appear in the UWSP Catalog.

Career Advising.

Career advising shall be the joint responsibility of the academic departments and the Career Specialists in the ACAC.

Departments.
Autonomy. 

Departments shall have autonomy in structuring their advising procedures within the limits set by these guidelines. (For example, a department may choose to have only a part of its faculty, or part of the faculty and academic staff, assigned to advising.)

Responsibility. 

Individual departments shall have primary responsibility for providing timely and accurate advising to their majors and minors, and to students in related disciplines assigned to that department for advising once the student has been transitioned to the department from the Academic and Career Advising Center.  While peer advising may be provided in units where it is appropriate and workable, it shall not replace faculty or academic staff advising.

Policies. 

Departments and functional equivalent units, in consultation with appropriate students, shall establish policies and procedures to support commitment to and assessment of individual advising.  Where appropriate, departments shall specifically include advising as a component of departmental and university service in merit considerations.

New Student Orientation. 

Individual departments may offer specific orientation programs to their majors and minors.

 

TRAINING ACADEMIC ADVISERS.

Training Required. 

All faculty and academic staff who serve as advisers shall complete an appropriate training and counseling program provided by ACAC in collaboration with Advising Council, a campus advisory body to the ACAC.

ACAC Peer Adviser Training. 

Individual departments electing to use peer advisers shall provide program specific training for peer advisers and shall establish policies and procedures for the use of peer advisers.  ACAC peer advisers will provide support to all students served by the ACAC.

ACAC peer adviser training shall, at a minimum, include discussion of the responsibilities of advisers, effective advising techniques, materials and sources for advising information and procedures for referral of advisees.

ACAC training shall include information on the importance of the General Education Program for the liberal arts education of the students.

REVIEWING THE ADVISING PROCESS.

Review Process. 

The ACAC, in consultation with the Academic Affairs Committee, shall develop and establish a review process which includes measurement of the effectiveness of the overall advising program.

Additionally, because differential tuition funds Academic and Career Advisers in ACAC, the Student Government Association (SGA) will be actively involved in assessment of advising services.

 

SECTION 4 ACADEMIC FREEDOM

UW-Stevens Point has adopted the AAUP 1940 Statement of Principles and Interpretive Comments on Academic Freedom and Tenure.

 

SECTION 5 - COPYRIGHT MATERIALS

Memorandum to Chancellors from the Office of Legal Counsel dated 3-29-83.

NOTE.  This is a verbatim copy but there are some changes in formatting.

EFFECT OF COPYRIGHT LAW REVISION ON PHOTOCOPYING

A new copyright law was passed by Congress and signed by the President in 1976, which among other things, provides some guidance on the relationship of copyright to photocopying for educational purposes. Photocopying for personal research or classroom purposes is discussed below in light of the new law and accompanying guidelines.

Photocopying by Faculty and Staff for Research and Teaching

The new law does not exempt all photocopying done for educational purposes from liability for copyright infringement. Teachers, researchers and students, like everyone else, are subject to the provisions of the law allowing only “fair use” of copyrighted materials without first seeking permission from the author or publisher,

However, we believe you would be in compliance with the law if: (1) The materials are not used repeatedly; that is, you have not used them in preceding classes and you do not intend to use them in subsequent classes; (2) no more than one copy is made for each student (3) the notice of copyright is included on each copy distributed; (4) the students are not assessed a fee beyond the actual cost of reproduction; and (5) in the case of longer materials and books, the portion copied is selective and sparing in comparison to the whole of the work.

The right to make multiple copies is weakened if there is any reason to believe that the copying will directly affect the potential market for the work or if copying was done without permission when the decision to copy was made with sufficient lead time to request permission. This does not mean, however, that an instructor has free license to copy what he/she wishes if the decision is made the week before classes.

The purpose of the following guidelines is to state the minimum standards of educational fair use under Section 107 of H.R. 2223. The parties agree that the conditions determining the extent of permissible copying for educational purposes may change in the future; that certain types of copying permitted under these guidelines may not be permissible in the future; and conversely that in the future other types of copying not permitted under these guidelines may be permissible under revised guidelines.

Moreover, the following statement of guidelines is not intended to limit the types of copying permitted under the standards of fair use under judicial decision and which are stated in Section 107 of the Copyright Revision Bill. There may be instances in which copying which does not fall within the guidelines stated below may nonetheless be permitted under the criteria of fair use.

GUIDELINES FOR CLASSROOM COPYING IN NOT-FOR-PROFIT EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS

Single Copying for Teachers

A single copy may be made of any of the following by or for a teacher at his or her individual request for his or her scholarly research or use in teaching or preparation to teach a class:

  1. A chapter from a book;
  2. An article from a periodical or newspaper;
  3. A short story, short essay or short poem, whether or not from a collective work;
  4. A chart, graph, diagram, drawing, cartoon or picture from a book, periodical, or newspaper.

Multiple Copies for Classroom Use

Multiple copies (not to exceed in any event more than one copy per pupil in a course) may be made by or for the teacher giving the course for classroom use or discussion; provided that:

  1. The copying meets the tests of brevity and spontaneity as defined below; and,
  2. Meets the cumulative effect test as defined below; and,
  3. Each copy includes a notice of the copyright.

Definitions

Brevity
  1. Poetry: (a) A complete poem if less than 250 words and if printed on not more than two pages or, (b) from a longer poem, an excerpt of not more than 250 words.
  2. Prose: (a) Either a complete article, story or essay of less than 2,500 words, or (b) an excerpt from any prose work of not more than 1,000 words or 100 of the work, whichever is less, but in any event a minimum of 500 words. (Each of the numerical limits stated in ‘i’ and ‘ii’ above may be expanded to permit the completion of an unfinished line of a poem or of an unfinished prose paragraph.)
  3. Illustration: One chart, graph, diagram, drawing, cartoon or picture per book or per periodical issue.
  4. ‘Special’ works: Certain works in poetry, prose or in ‘poetic prose’ which often combine language with illustrations and which are intended sometimes for children and at other times for a more general audience fall short of 2,500 words in their entirety. Paragraph ‘ii’ above notwithstanding such ‘special works’ may not be reproduced in their entirety; however, an excerpt comprising not more than two of the published pages of such special work and containing not more than 100 of the words found in the text thereof may be reproduced.

(Our note: Remember that these are minimum guidelines for “fair use,” not statutory limits on the length of pieces that can be photocopied without permission.)

Spontaneity
  1. The copying is at the instance and inspiration of the individual teacher, and
  2. (ii) The inspiration and decision to use the work and the moment of its use for maximum teaching effectiveness are so close in time that it would be unreasonable to expect a timely reply to a request for permission.’

(Our note: Section (i) is related to Section III(C)(B) below. For example, multiple photocopying cannot be done at the direction of a department head and still be considered a “fair use.”)

Cumulative Effect
  1. The copying of the material is for only one course in the school in which the copies are made.
  2. Not more than one short poem, article, story, essay or two excerpts may be copies from the same author, not more than three from the same collective work or periodical volume during one class term.
  3. There shall not be more than nine instances of such multiple copying for one course during one class term.

(The limitations stated in ‘ii’ and ‘iii’ above shall not apply to current news periodicals and newspapers and current news sections of other periodicals.)

(Our note: Section (i) has been read to mean that, in accordance with the other brevity, spontaneity and cumulative effect conditions, teachers may make multiple copies for one or more sections of a single course they teach, but they may not make an overrun for students in other courses they teach or for other teachers. Letter from Mr. Robert Hogan, National Council of Teachers of English, to Editor, Chronicle of Higher Education, published November 15, 1976.)

Prohibitions as to I and II above

Notwithstanding any of the above, the following shall be prohibited:

  1. Copying shall not be used to create or to replace or substitute for anthologies, compilations or collective works. Such replacement or substitution may occur whether copies of various works or excerpts there from are accumulated or reproduced and used separately.
  2. There shall be no copying of or from works intended to be ‘consumable’ in the course of study or of teaching. These include workbooks, exercises, standardized tests and test booklets and answer sheets and like consumable material.
  3. Copying shall not:
  1. substitute for the purchase of books, publishers, reprints or periodicals;
  2. be directed by higher authority;
  3. be repeated with respect to the same item by the same teacher from term to term.
  4. No charge shall be made to the student beyond the actual cost of the photo-copying.

Agreed, March 19, 1976.

Photocopying Done by Libraries

  1. By library patrons on unsupervised equipment. 

A library can avoid liability for copyright infringement in this situation by posting a notice on every machine that ‘the making of a copy may be subject to the copyright law.

  1. By the library for its own collection.

A distinction is made in the protection afforded a library when photocopying for its own collection (for preservation or replacement purposes) as opposed to photocopying at the request of patrons or other libraries. (See #3 below.)

A single copy of an unpublished work may be made solely for the purpose of replacement of a lost, stolen, damaged or deteriorating work, but only if the library first determines that an unused replacement cannot be obtained at a fair price.

All copies produced must bear notice of copyright.

  1. Interlibrary Arrangements and Individual Requests.

The new copyright law permits interlibrary arrangements that do not have the effect of allowing a library to obtain copies “in such aggregate quantities as to substitute for a subscription to or purchase of a work.” Guidelines for determining what quantity of copying will be considered a substitute for the purchase of copyrighted material were included in the conference report on the legislation. Under these guidelines, a library will not be entitled to the protection of the interlibrary arrangement exception if the library provides to any given requesting library:

  1. Six or more copies per year from any given periodical published within the last five years; or
  2. Six or more copies per year from any other given work.

Providing six or more copies from any given periodical published more than five years ago was left for future interpretation.

Under individual request, a library may make a single copy of no more than one article or other contribution to a copyrighted collection or periodical issue if:

  1. the copy becomes that property of the requester and the library has no notice that the copy would be used for any purpose other than private study, scholarship or research; and
  2. the library prominently displays a warning of copyright on order forms and at the place where copies are ordered.

A library may also, upon request, make a single copy of an entire work or a substantial part of it, subject to the above conditions (a) and (b), if the library has first determined that a copy of the work cannot be obtained at a fair price. 

As mentioned in #2 above, all copies produced must bear notice of copyright.

  1. Unrestricted Photocopying
  1. Unpublished Works

Unpublished works, such as theses and dissertations, may be protected by copyright. If such a work was created before January 1, 1978, and has not been copyrighted or published without copyright notice, the work is protected under the new Act for the life of the author plus fifty years, 17 U.S.C. 303, but in no case earlier than December 31, 2002. If such a work is published on or before that date, the copyright will not expire before December 31, 2027. Works created after January 1, 1978, and not published enjoy copyright protection for the life of the author plus fifty years. 17 U.S.C. 302.

  1. U.S. Government Publications

All U.S. Government publications with the possible exception of some National Technical Information Service Publications less than five years old may be photocopied without restrictions, except to the extent they contain copyrighted materials from other sources.

 

SECTION 6 - FACULTY AND STAFF ID CARDS

Faculty and staff are urged to have ID cards made.  The new ID cards, which include a photograph and bar code, are essential to use many of the facilities of the university.  Faculty and staff normally will be required to have the new ID card to

  • check out materials from the library or text rental;
  • cash checks at the Information Center;
  • purchase Personal Points; and
  • access the UW-Madison library.

In addition, government discounts on hotels and car rentals may be available even if faculty and staff do not have a corporate American Express Card issued through the university.

Pictures for ID cards are taken at the Point Card Office, University Center, during normal business hours Monday through Friday.

SECTION 7 - CHAPTER UWSP 18 CONDUCT ON UNIVERSITY LANDS

UWSP 18.01 Jurisdiction.

UWSP 18.02 Definitions.

UWSP 18.03 Law enforcement.

UWSP 18.04 Traffic rules.

UWSP 18.05 Parking rules.

UWSP 18.06 Protection of resources.

UWSP 18.07 Use of campus facilities.

UWSP 18.08 Personal conduct prohibitions.

UWSP 18.09 Alcohol and drug prohibitions.

UWSP 18.10 Offenses against public safety.

UWSP 18.11 Offenses against public peace and order.

UWSP 18.12 Property offenses.

UWSP 18.13 Penalties.

UWSP 18.14 Institutional regulations.

UWSP 18.15 Additional statutory penalty provisions regulating conduct on university lands.

 

UWSP 18.01 JURISDICTION.

These rules shall regulate conduct on all lands subject to the control of the board of regents of the University of Wisconsin System.

UWSP 18.02 DEFINITIONS.

For purposes of this chapter:

  1. “Board of regents” or “board” means the board of regents of the University of Wisconsin System.
  2. “Building” means any structure, including stadia, on university lands.
  3. The “chief administrative officer” means the chancellor of an institution or dean of a campus or their designees.
  4. “Discharge pollutants into storm sewers” means placing pollutants or water containing pollutants into any storm sewer on or serving university lands.
  5. “Discharge pollutants to storm water” means placing pollutants onto university lands so that they are carried by storm water to waters of the state.
  6. “Pollutants” has the meaning described in s. 283.01 (13), Stats.
  7. “University lands” means all real property owned by, leased by, or otherwise subject to the control of the board of regents.

UWSP 18.03 LAW ENFORCEMENT.

  1. The board may designate peace officers who are authorized to enforce these rules and regulations and to police all lands under the control of the board. These officers shall have all the powers provided in s. 36.11 (2), Stats., except where such powers are specifically limited or modified by the board. These officers may accept concurrent appointments as deputy sheriffs.
  2. Uniformed peace officers shall be identified by an appropriate shield or badge bearing the word “Police” and a number or name plate, which shall be conspicuously worn when enforcing this chapter. Peace officers assigned to non-uniformed duties shall identify themselves with an appropriate badge or police identification card when enforcing this chapter.
  3. Parking attendants are authorized to enforce the parking regulations in s. UWSP 18.05.

UWSP 18.04 TRAFFIC RULES.

  1. No person may operate any motor vehicle (self-propelled vehicle) on any roadway under the control of the board without a valid and current operator’s license issued under ch. 343, Stats., except a person exempt under the provisions of s. 343.05, Stats.
  2. No person may operate any motor vehicle on any roadway under the control of the regents unless the same has been properly registered as provided by ch. 341, Stats., unless exempt under the provisions of s. 341.05, Stats.
  3. All provisions of ch. 346, Stats., entitled “Rules of the Road,” which are applicable to highways as defined in s. 340.01 (22), Stats., and which are not in conflict with any specific provisions of these regulations, are hereby adopted for the regulation of all vehicular traffic, including bicycles, on all roadways, including those off-street areas designated as parking facilities, under the control of the board and are intended to apply with the same force and effect. All traffic shall obey the posted signs approved by the chief administrative officer regulating such traffic.
  4. All provisions of ch. 347, Stats., entitled “Equipment of Vehicles” which are applicable to highways as defined in s. 340.01 (22), Stats., are hereby adopted for the regulation of all vehicular traffic on the roadways under the control of the board and are intended to apply with the same force and effect, except those provisions of ch. 347, Stats., which conflict with specific provisions of these regulations.
  5. The chief administrative officer may require the registration of all student, faculty, or staff motor vehicles or bicycles on university lands under said officer’s jurisdiction and may limit or prohibit their use in designated areas during designated hours. Any person who violates institutional regulations promulgated under this subsection may be fined up to $25.

UWSP 18.05 PARKING RULES.

  1. Parking is prohibited at all times on roads, drives and fire lanes traversing university lands, except that the chief administrative officer is authorized to establish parking areas, parking limits, and methods of parking on the lands under said officer’s jurisdiction, and may designate parking areas for specific groups at specific times, providing such areas are properly posted as parking areas. Parking in university parking facilities may be restricted or prohibited as required for reasons of maintenance and snow removal.
  2. Except as provided in sub. (3), parking in university parking areas shall be prohibited during posted times to persons other than those specifically assigned to those areas. Motor vehicles so assigned to any parking areas shall be identified by a valid parking permit affixed to the vehicle in a manner prescribed by the chief administrative officer.
  3.  
  1. In order to provide parking in university parking facilities for patrons of public university events, motor vehicles may be permitted to park in facilities designated for this purpose by the chief administrative officer. Public events parking shall be for a limited time only, not exceeding 12 hours continuously, and appropriate fees may be established. Otherwise valid permits are voidable during this period.
  2. (b) The chief administrative officer may establish visitor parking lots and set appropriate fees for parking in those lots.
  3. (c) Unrestricted and unassigned parking areas for students, faculty, staff, and visitors may be established by the chief administrative officer.
  1.  
  1. Parking shall be prohibited at all times in areas which must be kept clear for the passage of fire apparatus. These areas shall be designated by standard signs reading “Fire Zone, No Parking at Any Time, Day or Night” or “Fire Lane, No Parking at Any Time, Day or Night.”
  2. Parking is prohibited at all times in areas which must be kept clear for vehicles to load and unload. These areas shall be designated by appropriate signs.
  1. Motor vehicles parked in a restricted parking area without a valid permit or motor vehicles parked in a fire zone, fire lane, loading zone, or no parking zone, and unlicensed or partially dismantled motor vehicles may, at the owner’s expense, be towed from the restricted parking areas and stored. Towed vehicles, if not claimed after notice to the owner, shall be considered abandoned and shall be disposed of as provided in s. 20.909 (1), Stats.
  2. Any person who violates any of the provisions of this section may be fined up to $200. Each institution shall establish a schedule of fines, which may include penalties for late payment.

UWSP 18.06 PROTECTION OF RESOURCES.

  1. Prohibited acts; land. No person may remove any shrubs, vegetation, wood, timber, rocks, stone, earth, signs, fences, or other materials from university lands, unless authorized by the chief administrative officer.
  2. Prohibited acts; wildlife. No person may remove, destroy, or molest any animal life (including birds and fish) within the boundaries of university lands except as authorized by the chief administrative officer or except when this provision conflicts with a special order of the department of natural resources.
  3. Prohibited dumping; prohibited discharges to storm water.
  1. No person may dump or deposit any garbage, waste, hazardous material, rubbish, brush, earth or other debris or fill into any university dumpster or garbage receptacle or on any university lands unless authorized by the chief administrative officer.
  2. No person may discharge pollutants to storm water or storm sewers on or serving university lands, except where authorized by the chief administrative officer and in conformance with state law.

Note: Nothing in these rules precludes campus law enforcement officers from pursuing informal educational resolutions in lieu of prosecuting a citation in appropriate circumstances.

UWSP 18.07 USE OF CAMPUS FACILITIES.

  1. Access to roofs, service tunnels, and maintenance facilities: No person may climb into, out of, or onto any university building, service tunnels or maintenance facilities, or walk or climb upon any university building or roof, except when emergency access to a fire escape is necessary, for required maintenance, or when authorized by the chief administrative officer.
  2. Closing hours.
  1. Except as specifically provided in this code, the chief administrative officer may establish closing hours and closed periods for university lands, buildings, or portions thereof. These closing hours and closed periods shall be posted in at least one conspicuous place adjacent to or at the periphery of the area to be closed or, in the case of buildings, on the building.
  2. No person, unless authorized to be present during closed periods, may enter or remain within the designated university lands, buildings, or portions thereof during a closed period established under this section.
  3. For the purpose of par. (b), “person authorized to be present” means a person authorized to be present by an order issued pursuant to par. (a) or s. 36.35 (2), Stats.
  4. No person, except those authorized to be present after the posted closing hour, may enter or remain in any university arboretum or picnic area unless traversing those areas or on park roads at the times the roads are open to the public.
  1. Limited entrance. The chief administrative officer may, by posting appropriate signs, limit or prohibit entrance to university lands, or portions thereof, in order to maintain or preserve an instruction or research area.
  2. Picnicking and camping. No person may picnic or camp on university lands, except in those areas specifically designated as picnic or camping grounds, or as authorized by the chief administrative officer. No person may violate any rules and regulations for picnicking or camping established and posted by the chief administrative officer. For purposes of this subsection, camping shall include the pitching of tents or the overnight use of sleeping bags, blankets, makeshift shelters, motor homes, campers or camp trailers.
  3. Prohibitions on blocking entrances. No person may intentionally physically block or restrict entrance to or exit from any university building or portion thereof with intent to deny to others their right of ingress to, egress from, or use of the building.
  4. Restricted use of student centers or unions. No person, except members of the student center or union, university faculty and staff, invited guests, and university-sponsored conference groups, may use student center or union buildings and grounds except on occasions when, and in those areas where, the buildings or grounds are open to the general public.
  5. Structures. No person may place or erect any facility or structure upon university lands unless authorized by the chief administrative officer.

UWSP 18.08 PERSONAL CONDUCT PROHIBITIONS.

  1. Animals.
  1. The presence of dogs, cats, and other pets is prohibited in all university buildings and in arboretums at all times except as authorized by the chief administrative officer. The chief administrative officer may also prohibit the presence of dogs, cats, and other pets on other designated university lands.
  2. The presence of dogs, cats and other pets is prohibited on all other university lands not described in par. (a) unless the animal is on a leash which is physically controlled by the individual responsible for the animal, except as authorized by the chief administrative officer.
  3. The chief administrative officer may not grant the exceptions allowed under par. (a) and (b) in any outdoor area where food is being served or where animals are otherwise prohibited by signage.
  4. Any pet waste deposited on university lands shall be removed and properly disposed of by the individual responsible for the animal.
  5. Any individual found in violation of this subsection may have the animal for which they are responsible impounded and be subject to the penalty provisions in s. UWSP 18.13.
  6. This section does not apply to police and service, therapy, and assistance animals when those animals are working.
  1. Athletic events.
  1. No person may enter onto the playing surface of an officially sanctioned athletic event while the event is in progress without prior authorization from the chief administrative officer. An event is in progress from the time when teams, officials, trainers, support staff, or bands first reach the playing surface until the time when they have left.
  2. As used in this subsection, “playing surface” means that area on which the event is contested, together with the contiguous area used by teams, officials, trainers, and support staff.
  1. Bicycles. No person may park or store a bicycle in buildings, on sidewalks or driveways, or in motor vehicle parking spaces, except in areas designated for that purpose or in bicycle racks, or as authorized by university housing policies. Bicycles shall be parked so as not to obstruct free passage of vehicles and pedestrians. Bicycle riding is prohibited on university lands when and where the intent is to perform tricks or stunts and those tricks or stunts may result in injury to any person or cause damage to property.
  2. Deposit of human waste products. No person may deposit human waste products upon, nor urinate or defecate upon, any university lands or facilities other than into a toilet or other device designed and intended to be used to ultimately deposit such human waste products into a septic or sanitary sewer system.
  3. Improper use of university identification cards.
  1. No person may falsify, alter or duplicate, or request the unauthorized falsification, alteration, or duplication, of a university identification card.
  2. No person may knowingly present a false, altered, or duplicate university identification card with the intent that such card be relied upon by university employees, university agents, or state or local officials in connection with obtaining services, privileges, or goods.
  3. No person may knowingly use or permit another person to use a university identification card for the purpose of making a false statement with respect to the identity of the user, and with the intent that such statement be relied upon by university employees or agents in connection with obtaining university services, privileges or goods.
  4. University officials may confiscate false, altered, or duplicate university identification cards, or university identification cards used in violation of par. (c).
  1. Physical security compliance.
  1. No person may ignore, bypass, circumvent, damage, interfere with, or attempt to deceive by fraudulent means, any university authorized security measure or monitoring device, whether temporary or permanent, that is intended to prevent or limit access to, or enhance the security of, university lands, events, facilities or portions thereof.
  2. (b) No person may duplicate, falsify or fraudulently obtain a university key or access control device, or make any unauthorized attempt to accomplish the same.
  3. (c) No person who is authorized to possess a university key or access control device may transfer a university key or access control device to an unauthorized person, nor may any unauthorized person be in possession of a university key or access control device.
  4. (d) Any university key or access control device in the possession of an unauthorized person may be confiscated by any authorized university official.
  1. Loitering.
  1. No minor person may loiter, idle, wander or play, either on foot or in or on any vehicle of any nature, on university lands between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 5:00 a.m. on Sunday through Thursday, and the hours of midnight through 5:00 a.m. on Friday and Saturday, unless accompanied by a parent, guardian, or other adult person having care and custody of the minor.
  2. This subsection shall not apply to minors returning home from functions authorized by any school or religious organization and carrying proof of identification on their persons, or to currently enrolled university students.
  1. Misuse of parking services.
  1. No person may falsify, alter or duplicate or request the unauthorized falsification, alteration, or duplication of any type of university parking permit.
  2. No person may knowingly display on a vehicle, or knowingly allow another person to display on a vehicle, a falsified, altered, duplicated, stolen, lost, or found parking permit.
  3. No person may knowingly provide false information to any university employee or agent with the intent to obtain a valid university parking permit.
  1. Postings and signage.
  1. No person may erect, post or attach any notices, posters, pictures or any item of a similar nature in or on any building or upon other university lands except on regularly established bulletin boards, or as authorized by the provisions of this code or by the chief administrative officer.
  2. No person may fail to comply with a sign that reasonably conveys prohibited behavior and that has been approved and posted on university buildings or lands in compliance with the university’s formal process for posting signs. This subsection does not apply to traffic related offenses (ch. 346, Stats.).
  1. Recreational activities.
  1. No person may swim, fish, boat, snowmobile, ride horseback or use any type of all-terrain or off-road vehicle on university lands except in those areas and at times expressly designated by the chief administrative officer and denoted by official signs.
  2. No person may dock, moor, park, or store any boats, boating gear, snowmobiles, or similar equipment on university lands except under conditions specified by the chief administrative officer.
  1. Tobacco use. The University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point is committed to providing a safe and healthy working and learning environment for the students, faculty, staff and visitors on its campus. It hereby adopts the following tobacco-free policy.

    The purpose of this policy is to protect the public health and welfare by prohibiting the use of tobacco products on the UW-Stevens Point campus and to encourage a healthier living and learning environment for all members of our campus community.

    The University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point Tobacco-free Policy is effective August 25, 2014. The policy applies to all the UW-Stevens Point facilities and vehicles, owned or leased, regardless of location. The use of tobacco products shall not be permitted in any enclosed place, including private residential space within UW-Stevens Point buildings. The use of tobacco products shall also be prohibited outdoors on all UW-Stevens Point campus property, including parking lots. This policy applies to all students, faculty, staff and other persons on campus, regardless of the purpose for their visit.

Definitions

  1. “Tobacco Product” means any product made or derived from tobacco that is intended for human consumption, including any component, part, or accessory of a tobacco product, including but not limited to cigarettes, cigars, pipe tobacco, hookah tobacco, snuff, chewing tobacco, dipping tobacco, bidis, blunts, clove cigarettes, or any other preparation of tobacco; and any product or formulation of matter containing biologically active amounts of nicotine that is manufactured, sold, offered for sale, or otherwise distributed with the expectation that the product or matter will be introduced into the human body by use, absorption, or inhalation. The definition of “tobacco product” excludes cessation products specifically approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in treating nicotine or tobacco dependence.
  2. “E-cigarette” means any electronic oral device, such as one composed of a heating element, battery, and/or electronic circuit, which provides a vapor of nicotine or any other substances, and the use or inhalation of which simulates smoking. This product is defined as a “tobacco product.” The term shall include any such device, whether manufactured, distributed, marketed, or sold as an e-cigarette, e-cigar, e-pipe, or under any other product name or descriptor.

Exceptions

Nicotine replacement products approved by the FDA (e.g. patches, gum, products for similar purposes.) are allowed for use on campus to support persons in the process of overcoming nicotine addiction.

This policy does not apply to the practice of cultural activities by American Indians that are in accordance with the American Indian Religious Freedom Act, 42 USC, sections 1996 and 1996a. All ceremonial-use exceptions must be approved in advance by the Facilities Services Department.

This policy does not apply to sponsored research projects in education or clinical instruction approved by the appropriate college dean. Any university sponsored artistic performers are also exempt from this policy. All other exceptions may be brought to the Dean of Students OR the Director of Human Resources for case by case approval. The success of this policy will depend on the thoughtfulness, consideration, and cooperation of tobacco users and non-tobacco users. All students, faculty, and staff share in the responsibility for adhering to and enforcing this policy. Violations of the policy will be treated in accordance with current disciplinary procedures defined in the university handbook.

  1. Ticket scalping.
  1. Every ticket or other evidence of the right of entry to any amusement, game, contest, exhibition, event, or performance given by or under the auspices of the University of Wisconsin System, or an institution of the University of Wisconsin System, shall be considered a revocable license to the person to whom the ticket has been issued and shall be transferable only on the terms and conditions prescribed on the ticket or other evidence of the right of entry.
  2. No person may buy or sell a ticket or other evidence of the right of entry for more than the price printed upon the face of the ticket.

UWSP 18.09 ALCOHOL AND DRUG PROHIBITIONS.

  1. Alcohol beverages.
  1. The use or possession of alcohol beverages is prohibited on all university premises, except in faculty and staff housing and as permitted by the chief administrative officer, subject to statutory age restrictions. The chief administrative officer may generally permit the use or possession of alcohol beverages by promulgating institutional regulations in consultation with appropriate staff and students, or in specific instances by written permission.
  2. No person may procure, sell, dispense, or give away alcohol beverages to any person contrary to the provisions of ch. 125, Stats.
  3. In this subsection, “alcohol beverages” means fermented malt beverages and intoxicating liquors containing 0.5% or more of alcohol by volume.
  4. Notwithstanding s. UWSP 18.14, institutional regulations developed pursuant to this subsection shall be reported to the president of the system for review and approval.
  1. Possession of drug paraphernalia.
  1. No person may use, or possess with the primary intent to use, drug paraphernalia to plant, propagate, cultivate, grow, harvest, manufacture, compound, convert, produce, process, prepare, test, analyze, pack, repack, store, contain, conceal, inject, ingest, inhale or otherwise introduce into the human body a controlled substance or controlled substance analog in violation of ch. 961, Stats.
  2. In this subsection, the term “drug paraphernalia” has the meaning specified in s. 961.571 (1), Stats.; the term “controlled substance” has the meaning specified in s. 961.01 (4), Stats.; and the term “controlled substance analog” has the meaning specified in s. 961.01 (4m), Stats.
  3. In determining whether an object is drug paraphernalia under this subsection, the factors listed in s. 961.572, Stats., and all other legally relevant factors, shall be considered.
  1. Possession of marijuana.
  1. No person may intentionally use or possess marijuana on university lands, except when such use or possession is authorized under ch. 961, Stats., or is permitted under s. 961.34, Stats.
  2. In this subsection, the term “marijuana” has the meaning specified in s. 961.01 (14), Stats.

UWSP 18.10 OFFENSES AGAINST PUBLIC SAFETY.

  1. Assaultive behavior.
  1. No person may intentionally strike, shove, hit, punch, kick, or otherwise subject another person to physical contact or cause bodily harm without the consent of the person.
  2. This subsection shall not be applicable if the individuals involved have a relationship, as defined in s. 968.075 (1) (a), Stats., which requires a law enforcement officer to investigate the matter as a domestic abuse incident.
  1. Containers in spectator facilities. No person may carry or possess any disposable container within the confines of public areas in spectator facilities. As used in this subsection “disposable container” means any bottle, can, or other container designed or used for carrying liquids or solids, but does not include a personally owned container designed for reuse and originally sold or purchased exclusively as a refillable container. The provisions of this section shall not apply to containers used or supplied by authorized concessionaires who are required to dispense beverages to consumers in either paper or plastic containers.
  2. Dangerous weapons.
  1. No person may carry, possess, or use any dangerous weapon on university lands or in university buildings or facilities, except with the written approval of the chief administrative officer or for law enforcement purposes.
  2. No person may display or portray as real any object that resembles a dangerous weapon on university lands or in university buildings or facilities, except with the written approval of the chief administrative officer.
  3. Dangerous weapons in violation of this subsection may be confiscated and removed from university lands by police.
  4. In this subsection, the term “dangerous weapon” has the meaning specified in s. 939.22 (10), Stats.
  1. Fire safety.
  1. No person may light, build or use, or cause another to light, build or use, any fires, including but not limited to burning candles, burning incense or gas or charcoal cooking appliances, on university lands or in university facilities except in such places as are established for these purposes and designated by the chief administrative officer.
  2. No person may handle burning material in a highly negligent manner. In this subsection, burning material is handled in a highly negligent manner if it is handled under circumstances in which the person should realize that a substantial and unreasonable risk of serious damage to property is created.
  3. No person may throw away any cigarette, cigar, pipe ash or other burning material without first extinguishing it.
  4. No person may interfere with, tamper with, or remove, without authorization, any smoke detector, fire extinguisher, fire hose, fire hydrant, fire sprinkler, or other firefighting equipment.
  5. No person may intentionally give a false fire alarm, whether by means of a fire alarm system or otherwise.
  6. No person may deface, remove, tamper with, or obstruct from view any sign which has been posted to provide directions for fire or emergency exits from university facilities.
  7. No person may remain in any university facility or on university lands when an audible or visual fire alarm has been activated or upon being notified by firefighting, law enforcement or security personnel to evacuate.
  1. Operation of a motor vehicle off roadways. No person shall operate an unauthorized motor vehicle or motorized device, including but not limited to motorcycles, mopeds, motor scooters and self-balancing transportation devices, off designated roadways, paved or unpaved, or on service roads or pedestrian paths, regardless of the surface, on university lands. This subsection does not apply to motorized wheelchairs or other mobility devices which have the primary design function of assisting the physically challenged.
  2. Possession of fireworks.
  1. No person may possess or use fireworks on university lands without authorization from the chief administrative officer.
  2. In this subsection, the term “fireworks” has the meaning specified in s. 167.10 (1), Stats.
  1. Resisting or obstructing police officers.
  1. No person may knowingly resist or obstruct a university police officer while that officer is doing any act in an official capacity and with lawful authority.
  2. In this subsection, “obstruct” includes without limitation knowingly giving false information or knowingly placing physical evidence with the intent to mislead a university police officer in the performance of his or her duty.
  1. Play vehicles. No person may use a skateboard, roller skates, roller blades, in-line skates, or any similar wheeled devices, a toboggan, or a sled anywhere on university lands, except as designated by the chief administrative officer.

It is the policy of the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point that the University designate specific areas for the use of skateboards, rollerskates, in - line skates, and similar wheeled devices in or on any University property. As guidance for the interpretation of this policy, the following shall be enacted:

  1. Wheeled devices shall not be used in enclosed/fenced areas, buildings or within 20 feet of doors and entryways.
  2. Ramps, stairs, curbs, ledges, loading docks, parking lots, benches, exterior or interior stairs, tennis courts, running tracks, other permanent and/or constructed fixtures may not be used in conjunction with these activities. It is the responsibility of each person operating these devices to act with due care and caution with an acknowledgment that pedestrians always have the right-of-way. None of the areas designed for the use of these devices is maintained specifically for use of the devices; furthermore, no area is limited exclusively to the use of these devices. If this policy is violated it shall be enforced by University Protective Services, applying fines and forfeitures as allowed under Chapter UWS 18.06, Wisconsin Administrative Code.
  1. Throwing hard objects. No person may, in a manner likely to cause physical harm or property damage, throw, drop, kick, hit or otherwise project any hard object, bottle, can, container, snowball or other item of a similar nature on university lands or within or from within university buildings or facilities.

UWSP 18.11 OFFENSES AGAINST PUBLIC PEACE AND ORDER.

  1. Computer use.
  1. No person may, with intent to harass, annoy or offend another person, send a message to the person on an electronic mail or other computerized communication system and in that message use any obscene, lewd, or profane language or suggest any lewd or lascivious act.
  2. No person may, with intent to harass, annoy or offend another person, send a message on an electronic mail or other computerized communication system with the reasonable expectation that the person will receive the message and in that message use any obscene, lewd, or profane language or suggest any lewd or lascivious act.
  3. No person may, with intent solely to harass another person, send repeated messages to the person on an electronic mail or other computerized communication system.
  4. No person may, with intent solely to harass another person, send repeated messages on an electronic mail or other computerized communication system with the reasonable expectation that the person will receive the messages.
  5. No person may, with intent to harass or annoy another person, send a message to the person on an electronic mail or other computerized communication system while intentionally preventing or attempting to prevent the disclosure of his or her own identity.
  6. No person may, while intentionally preventing or attempting to prevent the disclosure of his or her identity and with intent to harass or annoy another person, send a message on an electronic mail or other computerized communication system with the reasonable expectation that the person will receive the message.
  7. No person may knowingly permit or direct another person to send a message prohibited by this subsection from any computer terminal or other device that is used to send messages on an electronic mail or other computerized communication system and that is under his or her control.
  1. Disorderly conduct. No person may engage in violent, abusive, indecent, profane, boisterous, unreasonably loud, or otherwise disorderly conduct under circumstances in which the conduct tends to cause or provoke a disturbance, in university buildings or on university lands.
  2. Improper use of telephones.
  1. No person may make or cause the telephone of another repeatedly to ring with intent to harass any person at the called number.
  2. No person may make repeated telephone calls, whether or not conversation ensues, with intent to harass any person at the called number.
  3. No person may intentionally use an emergency telephone in a university building or on university lands when the person knows or reasonably should know that no emergency exists.
  4. No person, with the intent to harass or offend, may telephone another and use any obscene, lewd, or profane language or suggest any lewd or lascivious act.
  5. No person, with the intent to harass any person at the called number, may make a telephone call, whether or not conversation ensues, without disclosing his or her identity.
  6. No person may knowingly permit any telephone under his or her control to be used for any purpose prohibited by this subsection.
  1. Picketing, rallies, parades, demonstrations and other assemblies.
  1. In order to preserve the order which is necessary for the enjoyment of freedom by members of the university community, and in order to prevent activities which physically obstruct access to university lands or buildings and prevent the university from carrying on its instructional, research, public service, or administrative functions, any picketing, rally, parade, demonstration, other assembly, or congregation of spectators to such activity may be declared unlawful if its participants:
  1. Intentionally gather or intentionally remain assembled outside any university building in such numbers, in such proximity to each other or in such fashion as to physically hinder entrance to, exit from, or normal use of the building.
  2. Intentionally congregate or assemble within any university building in such fashion as to obstruct or seriously impair university-sponsored or university-authorized activities, or in such fashion as to violate any of the following conditions:
  1. No group may be admitted into the private office of any faculty member or other university employee unless invited by the authorized occupant of that office, and then not in excess of the number designated or invited by that person.
  2. No group may obstruct or seriously impair passage through corridors, stairways, doorways, building entrances, fire exits, and reception areas leading to offices.
  3. No group, not authorized to do so by the person in immediate charge of the room, or by a person designated by the chief administrative officer to approve requests for the use of rooms for meetings, may enter or occupy any university building or part thereof.
  4. No group may assemble immediately outside rooms at times when they are normally in use for classes, study, or research.
  5. No signs supported by standards or sticks shall be permitted in any assembly in a university building.
  1. Intentionally create a volume of noise that unreasonably interferes with university-sponsored or university-authorized activities.
  2. Intentionally employ force or violence, or intentionally constitute an immediate threat of force or violence, against members of the university community or university property.
  1. For the purpose of par. (a), “intentionally” means that the participant or spectator knew or reasonably should have known that his/her conduct by itself or in conjunction with the conduct of others would have the prohibited effect.
  2. The chief administrative officer may designate a university official or officials who shall have primary authority to implement par. (a). He/she may prescribe limitations for any picketing, rally, parade, demonstration or other assembly in order that it will meet the requirements of par. (a). When informed of any picketing, rally, parade, demonstration, or other assembly which may not comply with par. (a), the chief administrative officer or the designee may proceed immediately to the site and determine if there is compliance with par. (a). If he/she finds a violation of par. (a), he/she may declare the assembly unlawful or he/she may prescribe those limitations on numbers, location, or spacing of participants in the demonstration which are reasonably necessary to ensure compliance with par. (a). If he/she prescribes limitations, and if his/her limitations are not observed by the assembly, he/she may then declare the assembly unlawful. Any declaration of illegality or prescription of limitations shall be effective and binding upon the participants in the assembly unless and until modified or reversed.
  3. Any participant or spectator within the group constituting an unlawful assembly who intentionally fails or refuses to withdraw from the assembly after it has been declared unlawful under this section shall be subject to immediate arrest and liable to the penalties of s. UWSP 18.13.
  1. Sound-amplifying equipment.
  1. In order to permit the use of sound-amplifying equipment on university lands, if needed for the dissemination of ideas to large audiences, but to prevent its use from interfering with university functions which inherently require quiet, the following provisions shall apply:
  1. No person may use sound-amplifying equipment on any lands without the permission of the chief administrative officer, except as provided in par. (b).
  2. In granting or denying permission, the following principles shall govern:
  1. Except in extraordinary circumstances, permission may be granted to use the equipment only during the following hours, 12 noon to 1:30 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. every day, and only when the equipment is more than 50 feet from and directed away from any classroom building, residence hall, library or building being used as a study hall.
  2. An applicant for permission shall have the burden of establishing the need for amplification to communicate with the anticipated audience. In particular, the applicant must show that the audience can reasonably be anticipated to include at least 250 people.
  3. An applicant for permission shall have the burden of establishing that the volume and direction of the sound from the equipment will minimize interference with other activities.
  1. Any request for the permission required by this section must be submitted in writing to the chief administrative officer at least 24 hours prior to the intended use of the sound-amplifying equipment and must be signed by a student or employee of the institution where the equipment is to be used. The request shall contain:
  1. The proposed hours, date, and location where the equipment is to be used.
  2. The size of the anticipated audience and the reasons why the equipment is needed.
  3. A description of the proposed equipment which includes the manufacturer, model number, and wattage.
  4. The names of the owner of the equipment and of any person or persons, in addition to the person signing the application, who will be responsible for seeing that the equipment is operated in compliance with the terms of the permit and the provisions of this rule. The chief administrative officer may require the presence of additional persons if said officer believes this is necessary to ensure compliance.
  1. Permits issued by the chief administrative officer shall not be required for the use of university sound-amplifying equipment used with the permission of the university employee having control of the equipment for authorized university classes, research, or meetings in university buildings, or for university sponsored academic, recreational or athletic activities, or for crowd control by authorized university officials.
  2. For the purpose of this section, “sound-amplifying equipment” means any device or machine which is capable of amplifying sound and capable of delivering an electrical input of one or more watts to the loudspeaker.
  1. Persons prohibited from entering university buildings.
  1. University buildings and the university-authorized activities that occur therein are primarily dedicated to the support of the university mission of teaching, research, and service. No person may be present in any university building if his or her presence and/or behavior interferes with this purpose or with the university’s administrative operations, is in violation of a university policy, rule, regulation, or any other provision of this chapter, or is without the consent of an authorized university official or faculty member.
  2. Persons present in any class, lecture, laboratory, orientation, examination, or other instructional session shall be enrolled and in good standing or shall have the consent of an authorized university official or faculty member to be considered legally present.
  1. Persons prohibited from entering university lands.
  1. No person, who is in a state of suspension or expulsion from the university under ch. UWSP 17 , or who takes leave or resigns under charges after being charged by the university under ch. UWSP 17, may enter the university lands of any institution without the written consent of the chief administrative officer.
  2. No person who is convicted of any crime involving danger to property or persons as a result of conduct by him or her on university lands may enter any university lands within 2 years of the effective date of his or her conviction without the written consent of the chief administrative officer.
  3. In granting or denying consent to enter a campus under s. 36.35 (3), Stats., or par. (a) or (b), the following shall be considered:
  1. The probability that the offensive conduct will be continued or repeated by the applicant.
  2. The need for the applicant to enter university lands, for example, to attend a university disciplinary hearing in which the applicant is being tried or is to be a witness, or to receive treatment in university hospitals.
  1. No person who has been determined to have committed serious or repeated violations of ss. UWS 18.06 to 18.12 and to whom the chief administrative officer has issued a written order prohibiting entry on university lands may enter the university lands of that institution.
  2. The provisions of this section in no way limit the chief administrative officer from issuing a written order barring any person from entering the university lands of that institution in accordance with the chief administrative officer’s responsibility for the health, safety, and welfare of the university.
  3. For the purposes of s. 36.35 (3), Stats., and par. (b), “crime involving danger to property or persons” shall mean any crime defined in ch. 940, Stats. (crimes against life and bodily security); s. 941.12, Stats. (interfering with firefighting); s. 941.13, Stats. (false alarms); s. 941.20, Stats. (endangering safety by use of dangerous weapon); s. 941.21, Stats. (disarming a peace officer); s. 941.23, Stats. (carrying concealed weapon); s. 941.235, Stats. (carrying firearm in public building); s. 941.24, Stats. (possession of switchblade knife); s. 941.26, Stats. (machine guns and other weapons); s. 941.28, Stats. (possession of short-barreled shotgun or short-barreled rifle); s. 941.29, Stats. (possession of firearm); s. 941.295, Stats. (possession of electric weapon); s. 941.30, Stats. (recklessly endangering safety); s. 941.32, Stats. (administering dangerous or stupefying drug); s. 941.37, Stats. (obstructing emergency or rescue personnel); s. 943.01, Stats. (criminal damage to property); s. 943.02, Stats. (arson of buildings; damage of property by explosives); s. 943.03, Stats. (arson of property other than building); s. 943.05, Stats. (placing of combustible materials an attempt); s. 943.06, Stats. (Molotov cocktails); s. 943.10, Stats. (burglary); s. 943.11, Stats. (entry into locked vehicle); s. 943.14, Stats. (criminal trespass to dwellings); s. 943.32, Stats. (robbery); s. 944.20, Stats. (lewd and lascivious behavior); s. 946.41, Stats. (resisting or obstructing officer); s. 947.015, Stats. (bomb scares); s. 167.10, Stats. (fireworks regulated); or attempts to commit any of the above crimes as defined in s. 939.32, Stats.
  1. Selling, peddling and soliciting. No person may sell, peddle, or solicit for the sale of goods, services, or contributions on any university lands except in the case of:
  1. Specific permission in advance from a specific university office or the occupant of a university house, apartment, or residence hall for a person engaged in that activity to come to that particular office, house, apartment, or residence hall for that purpose.
  2. Sales by an individual of personal property owned or acquired by the seller primarily for his/her own use pursuant to an allocation of space for that purpose by an authorized university official.
  3. Sales of newspapers and similar printed matter outside university buildings.
  4. Subscription, membership, ticket sales solicitation, fund-raising, selling, and soliciting activities by or under the sponsorship of a university or registered student organization pursuant to a contract with the university for the allocation or rental of space for that purpose.
  5. Admission events in a university building pursuant to contract with the university, and food, beverage or other concessions conducted pursuant to a contract with the university.
  6. Solicitation of political contributions under ch. 11, Stats., and institutional regulations governing time, place, and manner.
  1. Campaigning in state-owned residence halls.
  1. The residence halls students of each institution, subject to the approval of the chief administrative officer, shall establish policies and procedures assuring that political literature may be distributed and political campaigning may be conducted in state-owned residence halls consistent with the rights of residence halls students, and prescribing the time, place and manner in which these activities may be conducted.
  2. Where appropriate and consistent with the rights of residence halls students, the policies and procedures developed under this subsection shall apply to all residence halls at an institution. Matters to be addressed in institutional policies and procedures shall include at least the following:
  1. The hours of the day and the time of year, if any, to which particular activities shall be limited.
  2. The locations in residence halls, if any, to which particular activities shall be limited.
  3. Any requirement for registering or obtaining permission to enter a residence hall before engaging in a particular activity.
  1. Notwithstanding s. UWSP 18.14, institutional policies and procedures developed pursuant to this subsection shall be reported to the board of regents for approval.
  2. Institutional policies and procedures developed pursuant to this subsection shall be available at each residence hall, at the office of each chief administrative officer of an institution, and at the office of the secretary to the board of regents.

 

UWSP 18.12 PROPERTY OFFENSES.

  1. Computer data, programs, equipment, or supplies. No person may willfully, knowingly, and without authorization do or attempt to do any of the following:
  1. Modify, destroy, access, take possession of, or copy data, computer programs or supporting documentation;
  2. Disclose restricted access codes or other restricted access information to a person not authorized to possess such codes or information;
  3. Modify, destroy, use, take or damage a computer, computer system or computer network;
  4. Modify, destroy, use, take or damage any equipment or supplies used, or intended to be used, in a computer, computer system or computer network.
  5. Cause an interruption in service by submitting a message or multiple messages to a computer, computer program, computer system, or computer network that exceeds the processing capacity of the computer, computer program, computer system, or computer network.
  1. Fraud in university accommodations or eating places.
  1. No person may, after having received any food, lodging or other service or accommodation at any university housing facility or eating place, intentionally abscond without paying for it.
  2. No person may, while in any university housing or lodging facility or eating place, intentionally defraud the university or its employees or agents in charge of the facility or eating place, in any transaction arising out of the relationship as a user of the housing or lodging facility or eating place.
  3. In this subsection, prima facie evidence that the person intentionally absconded without paying for the food, lodging or other service or intentionally defrauded the university or its employees or agents has the meaning and includes the items of proof set forth in s. 943.21 (2), Stats.
  1. Issue of worthless check.
  1. No person may issue any check or other order for the payment of money in an amount not more than $2,500 which, at the time of issuance, he or she intends shall not be paid.
  2. In this subsection, prima facie evidence that the person, at the time he or she issued the check or other order for the payment of money, intended it should not be paid, has the meaning, and includes the items of proof set forth in s. 943.24, Stats.
  3. This subsection does not apply to a postdated check or to a check given for past consideration, except a payroll check.
  1. Library materials.
  1. No person may intentionally take, carry away, transfer, conceal, or retain possession of any library material without the consent of a library official, agent, or employee and with the intent to deprive the library of possession of the material.
  2. The concealment of library material beyond the last station for borrowing library material in a library is evidence of intent to deprive the library of possession of the material. The discovery of library material which has not been borrowed in accordance with the library’s procedures or taken with consent of a library official, agent or employee and which is concealed upon the person or among the belongings of the person or concealed by a person upon the person or among the belongings of another is evidence of intentional concealment on the part of the person so concealing the material.
  1. Retail theft.
  1. No person may intentionally alter indicia of price or value of merchandise or take and carry away, transfer, conceal or retain possession of merchandise held for resale by a merchant, or property of the merchant, without his or her consent and with intent to deprive the merchant permanently of possession, or the full purchase price of the merchandise.
  2. No person may intentionally remove a theft detection device from merchandise, or use a theft detection shielding device, without the merchant’s consent and with intent to deprive the merchant permanently of possession, or the full purchase price of the merchandise.
  3. In this subsection, “merchant” includes any “merchant” as defined in s. 402.104 (3), Stats., and any vendor or bookstore authorized to sell in university buildings or on university lands.
  4. In this subsection, “theft detection device” means any tag or other device that is used to prevent or detect theft and that is attached to merchandise held for resale by a merchant or to property of a merchant, and “theft detection shielding device” means any laminated or coated bag or device designed to shield such merchandise from detection by an electronic or magnetic theft alarm sensor.
  1. Theft.
  1. No person may intentionally take and carry away, use, transfer, conceal, or retain possession of movable property of another with a value of under $100, without consent and with the intent to deprive the owner permanently of such property.
  2. No person may intentionally take and carry away, use, transfer, conceal, or retain possession of movable property of another with a value of at least $100 but not more than $1,000, without consent and with the intent to deprive the owner permanently of such property.
  1. Use of cheating tokens. No person may obtain the property or services of another by depositing anything which he or she knows is not lawful money or is an unauthorized token in any receptacle used for the deposit of coins or tokens.
  2. Vandalism. No person may break, tear up, mar, destroy or deface any notice, tree, vine, shrub, flower or other vegetation, or dislocate any stones, or disfigure natural conditions, or deface, alter, destroy or damage in any way any other property, real or personal, within the boundaries of any university lands unless authorized by the chief administrative officer.

 

UWSP 18.13 PENALTIES.

Unless otherwise specified, the penalty for violating any of the rules in ss. UWSP 18.06 to 18.12 shall be a forfeiture of not more than $500, as provided in s. 36.11 (1) (c), Stats.

Note: Violations of the rules in ss. UWS 18.06 to 18.12 will be processed in accordance with the citation procedure established in s. 778.25, Stats.

UWSP 18.14 INSTITUTIONAL REGULATIONS.

Institutional regulations promulgated under ss. UWSP 18.04 to 18.12 shall take effect when filed with the secretary of the board.

UWSP 18.15 ADDITIONAL STATUTORY PENALTY PROVISIONS REGULATING CONDUCT ON UNIVERSITY LANDS.

  1. Controlled substances. The use or possession of controlled substances as defined in s. 961.01 (4), Stats., is prohibited on all university property with the specific exemptions set forth in ch. 961, Stats., and as permitted under s. 961.34, Stats. The penalty provisions of ch. 961, Stats., and chs. UWS 17  and 18  may apply to violations occurring on university lands.
  2. Student convicted of dangerous and obstructive crime. Section 36.35 (3), Stats., provides: “Any person who is convicted of any crime involving danger to property or persons as a result of conduct by him which obstructs or seriously impairs activities run or authorized by an institution and who, as a result of such conduct, is in a state of suspension or expulsion from the institution, and who enters property of that institution without permission of the chancellor of the institution or the chancellor’s designee within 2 years, may for each such offense be fined not more than $500 or imprisoned not more than 6 months, or both.”

 

SECTION 8 STUDENT CREDIT HOUR GUIDELINES FOR TENURE MANAGEMENT

Tenure management within academic programs at the University is based, in large measure, on the student credit hours produced by each program at the lower (LD), upper (UD), and graduate divisions (GR).  Different modes of instruction across the disciplines as well as within a given discipline give rise to different expectations regarding the level of staffing required to adequately address student needs.  The following (per semester) student credit hour guidelines are generally used to define a full-time-equivalent faculty position for tenure management purposes.

 

 

UNIVERSITY WIDE GUIDELINES

LD

UD

GR

 

 

 

 

There are guidelines that apply to specific groups of courses regardless of the department or college, such as:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Humanities General Degree Requirements Courses

475

300

200

Social Science General Degree Requirement Courses

475

300

200

Writing Emphasis 

200

200

 

Seminar courses 

 

180

 

Also, a number of specialized courses have been assigned individual SCH guidelines.  For information on these courses, consult the Registrar.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS AND COMMUNICATION

LD

UD

GR

 

 

 

 

ART AND DESIGN

 

 

 

Art - Appreciation and History

475

300

200

Art - Foundation Studio

250

250

150

Art - Specialty Studio

225

200

150

Art Education - Nonstudio

475

300

200

Art Education - Studio

225

200

150

 

 

 

 

ARTS MANAGEMENT

250

250

 

 

 

 

 

COMMUNICATION

300

250

150

 

 

 

 

FINE ARTS

250

250

 

 

 

 

 

MUSIC

 

 

 

Music - Appreciation, History and Literature

475

300

200

Music - Applied/Private Instruction

70

70

70

Music - Large Ensemble

270

270

200

Music - Small Ensemble

140

110

110

Music - Theory

180

100

100

Music Education - Lecture

475

300

200

Music Education - Studio

225

200

200

 

 

 

 

THEATRE AND DANCE

 

 

 

Dance Education - Lecture

475

300

200

Dance - Appreciation

475

300

200

Dance - Studio

200

150

120

Theatre Arts Education- Lecture

475

300

200

Theatre Arts - Appreciation

475

300

200

Theatre Arts - Practice

200

150

120

 

 

 

 

COLLEGE OF LETTERS AND SCIENCE

LD

UD

GR

 

 

 

 

BIOLOGY

375

250

120

Biology Education

475

300

200

 

 

 

 

CHEMISTRY

 

 

 

     Lecture

475

288

 

     Lab

120

60

 

     Discussion

288

288

 

 

 

 

 

COMPUTING, NEW MEDIA TECHNOLOGIES

 

 

 

Computer Science Education

475

300

200

Computer Information Systems 

270

250

200

Learning Technologies

475

300

200

Web and Digital Development 

270

250

200

 

 

 

 

ENGLISH

 

 

 

English - Literature

475

300

150

English - Writing

250

250

150

English Education

475

300

200

 

 

 

 

GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY

 

 

 

Geography - laboratory

375

250

120

Geography - lecture

475

300

150

Geology 

375

250

120

 

 

 

 

HISTORY

475

300

200

 

 

 

 

INTERDISCIPLINARY

 

 

 

International Studies 

475

300

200

Peace Studies

475

300

200

Women’s Studies

475

300

200

 

 

 

 

MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

 

 

 

Mathematics 

400

250

150

Mathematics Education

475

300

200

 

 

 

 

PHILOSOPHY

475

300

200

Anthropology 

475

300

200

Religious Studies 

475

300

200

 

 

 

 

PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY

 

 

 

Astronomy 

375

300

200

Physics 

300

150

120

 

 

 

 

POLITICAL SCIENCE

475

300

200

 

 

 

 

PSYCHOLOGY

475

300

150

Psychology - Statistics

 

250

150

 

 

 

 

SOCIOLOGY

475

300

200

Sociology - Statistics

 

250

 

 

 

 

 

WORLD LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

 

 

 

Comparative Literature 

475

300

150

Foreign Language - Education

475

300

200

Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Russian, etc.

300

200

150

       

COLLEGE OF NATURAL RESOURCES

LD

UD

GR

       

NATURAL RESOURCES

375 250 120
       

PAPER SCIENCE

250

200

120

 

 

 

 

COLLEGE OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

LD

UD

GR

 

 

 

 

BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS

 

 

 

Accounting 

400

300

200

Business

475

300

200

Economics 

475

300

200

Economics - statistics

 

250

200

 

 

 

 

COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND DISORDERS

 

250

150

80

Communication Sciences and Disorders Education

475

300

200

 

 

 

 

EDUCATION

 

 

 

Early Childhood Education 

475

300

200

Education 

475

300

200

Student Teaching 

 

300

 

Instructional Resources 

475

300

200

 

 

 

 

HEALTH, EXERCISE SCIENCE, AND ATHLETICS

 

 

 

Athletic Training

300

150

 

Coaching 

300

250

200

Health Education

475

300

200

Physical Education 

300

250

200

Physical Education for the Exceptional Individual 

300

250

200

Recreation

300

250

200

Sports Medicine 

300

250

200

Wellness 

475

300

200

 

 

 

 

HEALTH PROMOTION AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

 

 

 

Family and Consumer Education 

475

300

200

Food and Nutrition

350

200

120

Food Systems Management 

350

200

120

Health Promotion/Wellness 

300

250

200

Human Development 

350

200

120

Safety and Health Protection 

300

250

200

 

 

 

 

INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE

 

 

 

Interior Architecture

350

200

120

IA - History

475

300

200

Foundation Studio

250

250

 

Specialty Studio

225

200

120

Practice

 

150

 

Seminar Studio

180

180

 

Seminar

 

180

120

 

 

 

 

LEARNING RESOURCES

475

300

200

 

 

 

 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY

375

250

120

 

 

 

 

MILITARY SCIENCE

475

300

200

 

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION 9 GRADUATE COURSE POLICY

DEFINITIONS OF SPECIAL GRADUATE COURSES

Independent Study emphasizes a specific topic.  The topic selected is not normally a regular course offering.  Instruction is generally under the guidance of a professor who meets regularly with the student.  Credit may be variable, depending on the workload and the time span over which the course is offered.  Topics for which credit has been received cannot be repeated.

Special Topics courses emphasize a topic of narrow focus. The topic selected is generally one that meets the special needs of a group of students.  The topic is not intended to be repeated.  Instruction is normally in the form of lectures, discussions, or other means of exchange of ideas.  Credit may be variable, depending on the workload and the time span over which the course is offered.

Workshops emphasize a topic of interest to a wide group of students.  Workshop offerings may be repeated.  Instruction involves free discussions, the exchange of ideas, demonstration of methods, the acquisition of skills and techniques in a specialized area within a discipline, and participation and problem-solving given mainly for and by adults already employed or those adequately prepared with common interests and problems based on the needs and wants of the group.  The final result should be clearly defined, such as progress in a particular skill, or individual or group reports or papers on the conclusions reached or solutions developed or for class analyses and reactions.  Workshops may have variable time spans as well as variable graduate credit.

A Seminar collects a small group of advanced students engaged in presenting either existing or original research under the guidance of a professor who meets regularly with them for reports, discussions, and informal lectures.  Seminars may have variable time spans as well as variable graduate credit.

A Colloquium stresses discussion of a specific subject or meetings that several lecturers take turns in leading.  Colloquia may have variable time spans as well as variable graduate credit.  (Colloquium is normally included under Special Topics.)

A Symposium is a meeting or conference of limited duration for discussion of some topic at which several speakers deliver short addresses on various aspects of the topic.  No graduate credit.

MINIMUM GRADUATE STANDARDS FOR DUAL-NUMBERED (SLASH) COURSES

Courses granting graduate credit should be structured and taught primarily at the graduate level of instruction.  Ideally, dual-numbered courses should enroll primarily graduate students, with a minority of the course enrollment made up of academically superior undergraduate students.  Graduate Council recognizes, however, the impracticality of this ideal in some disciplines.  Therefore, Graduate Council establishes the following minimum guidelines for graduate students enrolled in dual-numbered courses:

Graduate students will be required to accomplish at least one additional objective beyond the requirements of undergraduate students in the same course.  Faculty are encouraged to utilize more than one of these additional objectives in their classes.  Additional objectives shall be qualitative rather than quantitative in nature.  Examples of suitable additional objectives are a research project with a written and/or oral report, a term paper, a seminar or presentation given to the class, a classroom utilizable product that can be shared with others, or essay and/or oral examinations as alternatives to objective exams given to undergraduates in the same class.  These examples are not inclusive, and faculty are encouraged to develop other qualitative objectives for their specific courses.  These additional qualitative objectives will be included in the syllabus for each course.

In addition, faculty members teaching dual-numbered courses are encouraged to utilize modes of instruction that involve dialogue, student discussion, and student presentations.  Where this is not feasible for the entire class, faculty are encouraged to have separate or additional discussion/seminar sessions for the graduate students.

Dual-numbered courses will be taught by members of the Graduate Faculty.

All departments offering dual-numbered courses will use these Graduate Council guidelines to develop specific procedures insuring adequate graduate level instruction in those courses.  These procedures will be submitted for information to the Graduate Council and filed with the Graduate Dean.

 

SECTION 10 - EQUAL ACCESS FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

STATEMENT OF POLICY

University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point (UWSP) supports access to educational opportunities, programs, and university related events to qualified individuals with disabilities. UWSP provides reasonable accommodations to qualified individuals with disabilities in all aspects of the educational process. The University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point (UWSP) complies with the Board of Regent’s policy 14-10 “Non-Discrimination on the Basis of Disability.”

PROGRAM AND CLASSROOM ACCOMMODATION

Program and course accommodations are managed through the Disability and Assistive Technology Center (DATC). Accommodations are determined on a case-by-case, individual basis through an interactive process. The student, DATC professional, and if necessary, other professionals (e.g. faculty members, medical professionals, lab managers or residential living staff) will determine reasonable modifications. The determination of reasonable accommodations is based on the student’s abilities, the essential functions of the course or experience, and the physical environment. If a student believes that accommodation(s) recommended by DATC are inappropriate or insufficient, they may appeal to the Dean of the University College. 

Program Accommodation

Once DATC professionals arrive at program accommodation recommendations, after consulting appropriate professionals, said recommendations will be forwarded to the appropriate Dean for approval. If the Dean refuses to approve the accommodation, the student may appeal this decision to the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs.

Classroom Accommodation

Faculty members will be notified in writing of a classroom accommodation in a timely manner. Accommodations may or may not require faculty participation. Faculty are required to support or provide accommodations as specified by DATC. Faculty will be notified if a sign language interpreter, captionist, aide, or service animal will be in their classroom prior to the start of each academic session.

Faculty and staff with questions about accommodations should contact:

Disability and Assistive Technology Center (DATC)
DATC@uwsp.edu

 

SECTION 11 - FACULTY-STUDENT POLICIES

CLASS MEETINGS

Faculty are expected to meet their classes at the scheduled time and place.  The faculty member should report any cancellation of class sessions to the department chairperson.  Any such cancellations on the day immediately preceding a holiday or a vacation period should have prior approval of the department chairperson.

Please refer to Chapter 5, Section 15 “Policies Pertaining to the Provision of Distance Education” of this Handbook for information specific to online courses.

COURSE SYLLABI

A syllabus of each course taught is prepared by the faculty member and placed on file in the office of the Dean of the College or is available to the Dean electronically.  The syllabus should include a course outline, a minimum bibliography and be consistent with Chapter 9, Section 1  “Communal Bill of Rights and Responsibilities.”

EXAMS

In particular, final exams that are not returned to the students should be kept on file for a minimum period of one semester.

FINAL EXAMINATIONS

No final or last exams will be given during the final week of classes.  All instructors are expected to meet with their classes during the final examination period at the time and place scheduled.  There is no final exam period scheduled on campus for courses taught 100% distance learning, courses for which no campus visit is required at any time.  Instructors of partial distance learning courses, courses of which primarily 75% or more are delivered via distance learning and have at least one required campus visit, may at their own discretion determine if a final examination meeting on campus is warranted.  If the university must declare an official emergency during the final examination period, the exams that are postponed will be rescheduled on the next available date, after the exam period has ended, as determined by the Chancellor.  Rescheduled exams due to a university emergency will be held in the same rooms and at the same times as their originally scheduled date.  Exceptions to the above must be made with the appropriate dean’s approval except that instructors, at their discretion, may modify the schedule for students who have three examinations on one day.  Instructors not adhering to this policy may lose salary for the days involved at the discretion of the department Chair and Dean. 

MAKE-UP WORK

Instructors should furnish students a reasonable amount of help in making up work missed, where the reason for absence concerns emergencies, off-campus trips, illness, and the like.

OFFICE HOURS

Each teaching faculty member should post his/her office hours for the convenience of students and colleagues.  Departmental offices should also have the listing of hours for the departmental faculty.

RECORDS OF GRADES

Records of grades, especially record books, are the property of the University and should not be destroyed by individual instructors.  Instructors leaving the institution should turn in record books to their respective departments.

 

SECTION 12 - PRIVACY OF STUDENT RECORDS/CLASSROOM PERFORMANCE AND AUTHORIZATION TO RELEASE INFORMATION

The Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students privacy regarding nearly all aspects of their academic performance.  This includes any information regarding their performance in the classroom including grades, test scores, and class schedules.  When any individual, including a parent/guardian(s) or potential employer, contacts a University official or professor regarding a student’s academic performance, the official/professor must first obtain written permission from the student before releasing that information.  This release form protects the rights of the student as well as affording protection to University personnel.  (see example release form)

When a parent/guardian asks to speak with a faculty member concerning their child’s academic performance, the faculty member must decide if such a conversation is warranted and beneficial to the student.  Whether the conversation takes place via phone, e-mail, or in a face-to-face meeting, written permission must be obtained from the student.  When a face-to-face meeting takes place, and especially when the meeting has the potential to be confrontational in nature, it is in the best interest of both the University staff member and the parent/guardian to request that a third-party observer be present.  For example, faculty members might request the chair of their department be present, and a parent/guardian might ask a friend or relative to attend the meeting.  The presence of an observer(s) helps to ensure a productive meeting and a more accurate representation of the content of the meeting, if needed, in the future.

Prior to a face-to-face meeting with a parent/guardian over a student’s academic performance, the University official/professor must (1) obtain the student’s written permission and (2) should also notify the parent/guardian of their option of having an observer attend the meeting-and that an observer may be present from the University.  Following the meeting, the parent/guardian should be informed of other avenues that can be pursued (i.e. grade appeals, a separate discussion with the College Dean) if they are not satisfied with the outcome of the initial meeting.

SECTION 13 - SCHEDULING NON-ACADEMIC OFF-CAMPUS EVENTS/TRIPS

Non-academic off-campus events/trips sponsored by authorized university groups during breaks should not commence before the official beginning of a break nor should they run beyond the end of a scheduled break.  In special circumstances, the vice chancellor/provost may grant a waiver to this policy.

SECTION 14 - GUIDELINES FOR USE OF ELECTRONIC DEVICES IN CLASSROOMS AND LABORATORIES

The University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point is committed to providing an environment conducive to student achievement and learning. Electronic devices, while an integral part of today’s society, can severely disrupt that environment.

Electronic devices also represent a new frontier for students wishing to cheat in classes. Picture phones, especially, offer opportunities for this type of misconduct. Students can photograph relevant information (notes, book pages) and view it during class, or can take pictures of exam questions and answers and circulate these via picture mail or text messaging. Students have also sent messages to others in class asking them to sign in their spots on attendance rosters.

Recognizing these facts, the following guidelines are offered.

  1. Instructors who have an electronic device policy of any sort must include it on the course syllabus. The reasons for the policy should be explained clearly, and consequences for breaking the policy should be outlined.
  2. Instructors who elect to restrict electronic devices in their classrooms should consider making exceptions in extenuating circumstances, for example, if a family member is critically ill.
  3. If students use electronic devices as a means for committing academic misconduct, instructors should follow the same procedures for investigating said misconduct that they would use if a student committed an act not facilitated by the use of technology. Full details of that procedure can be found in the University Handbook, Chapter 5, Section 2

 

SECTION 15 - POLICIES PERTAINING TO THE PROVISION OF DISTANCE EDUCATION

General Information:

Distance education is a formal educational process in which the majority of the course instruction (interactions between students and instructors and among students) occurs when students and instructors are not in the same place.  Distance education instruction may be synchronous or asynchronous, and may employ correspondence study, audio, video, computer technologies, or any combination of the preceding.  To facilitate distance educational activities, the university will maintain a Distance Education Handbook which will include expanded definitions and interpretations of the policies below.

Unless otherwise stated, all university policies, standards, and guidelines for on and off-campus instruction apply to distance education.

UWSP Administrative Responsibilities and Support

The university acknowledges that distance education, while offering flexibility to students, concomitantly imposes additional instructor responsibilities.  To achieve the learning outcomes of each class offering, the university shall assure that the institution’s administrative policies and procedures support an effective, equitable, and efficient distance education infrastructure with sufficient resource allocation to maintain the quality of offerings and services.

To provide this support, the university will maintain a central repository for distance education program information and a support structure for facilitating the development and refinement of distance education programs, policies, procedures, and services university-wide.

The university will regularly evaluate the effectiveness of the academic and support services provided to instructors in online courses and utilize these results for improvement. Similarly, to facilitate student retention and achievement, the assessment results pertaining to programming and support will also be utilized to improve student services.

Distance Education Pricing

Distance education course prices will be determined by the UWSP Distance Education Pricing Policy in accordance with UW System Distance Education Pricing Principle and UW System Tuition and Fee Policies for Credit Instruction.

Course Approvals, Coding, Delivery, Evaluation, and Ownership

Course Approvals

To ensure compliance with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, and to meet Universal Design standards, the distance education course approval process will include a review of course content and methodologies by departments and/or units prior to submission of curriculum proposals to the University Curriculum Committee.  Courses (and individual sections of courses offered through distance education) will meet the minimum requirements detailed in the Guide for Approval of Revisions of Courses with Online Components Checklist located on the Curriculum Committee website.  Additional academic standards and criteria may be established by departments or units.

Course Coding

All distance education courses and sections will be coded and clearly identified in the course catalog and timetable.  Consistency of codes will be utilized throughout university documentation.  Coding definitions can be located in the UWSP Distance Education Handbook.

Course Delivery

All course delivery technologies must comply with all applicable statutes and laws (e.g., FERPA, copyright).  To assure compliance with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, all programs, services, and activities offered via distance education must be accessible to, and usable by, persons with documented disabilities who have met the technical and academic standards for admission.

Provision of necessary technologies and pedagogies to ensure course accessibility will be provided by the instructor of the distance education course, with support and leadership by the relevant contact person from Information Technology.  All instructors should understand the university can only guarantee technical support for distance education courses that use the current Learning Management System (LMS) adopted by the university system (e.g. Desire2Learn).  If an alternative LMS or related programs are utilized, the university cannot ensure technical and design assistance.  Additionally, alternative LMS or online tools must not provide storage or distribution of student education records.  To ensure FERPA compliance, consultation with the university Information Technology when selecting third-party online tools or programs not currently endorsed by the university is required.

Students engaged in assignments requiring posting of work published online (including blogs and social media) should give consent to this publication and be provided with an alternate assignment if they do not wish to have their work disclosed.  A statement identifying this option should be included in the syllabus.

Instructors engaged in distance education shall have academic freedom as teachers and researchers in full accordance with the provisions of the 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure, including “freedom in the classroom in discussing their subject” and “full freedom in research and in the publication of the results.”

Methods of presentation and course materials are to be under the control of the instructor assigned to develop and/or teach the distance education course.  Supervision by the instructor’s colleagues within the department or program shall be subject to the usual norms and responsibilities of oversight associated with the department.

Course Evaluation

All distance education courses and programs will be assessed and evaluated according to the course evaluation procedures in effect for on-campus courses.  Additional departmental course evaluation criteria and procedures established for
on-campus courses may be modified and implemented for distance education courses.

Student evaluations in online, hybrid, and Continuing Education courses will be conducted regularly and may be considered in personnel decisions, instructional improvement, and recognition, as outlined in the University Handbook (Chapter 4A, Section 2   and Chapter 4B, Section 3 ).  The Student Evaluation of Online Course Instruction Form and supporting information is located in the University Handbook (Chapter 4D, Section 15 ).

Course Content Ownership

All course content ownership considerations shall be governed by the UW System Copyrightable Instructions Materials Ownership, Use and Control policy and campus policies (University Handbook Chapter 9, Section 5 ).  Unless mutually agreed upon explicitly in the contract, the university affirms that instructors retain the intellectual property rights for materials produced while under contract, including instructional materials. The university allows instructors to make reasonable use of university-owned equipment, software, and personnel while preparing research, instructional, and service materials. If materials are developed with “substantial” use of university support, as outlined in the UW System Administrative Policy 191, contractual agreements with the authors and producers of the materials and the university shall be established. For more information on intellectual property rights, contact the Associate Vice Chancellor of Personnel, Budgets, and Grants, who will work in concert with system legal to determine ownership.

Instructor Qualifications, Responsibilities, Support and Training, and Compensation

Instructor Qualifications

All courses and sections offered via distance education shall have a qualified instructor approved and assigned by the appropriate department head.  The qualifications, skills, and experience level for distance education instructors should be comparable to instructors engaged in face-to-face instruction.  Departments shall ensure that instructors assigned to distance education courses are not only qualified to meet the learning objectives of the course, but also qualified to support the program learning outcomes.  Finally, departments shall ensure that instructors assigned to distance education courses possess the necessary technical and pedagogical skills to accomplish excellent distance education instruction.

Instructor Responsibilities

The distance education course instructor shall retain the primary responsibility and authority for the academic management and course content of the assigned course.  Current and relevant content and methodologies are expected and the instructor and/or sponsoring program of the course are responsible for regularly reviewing and updating course content.  The instructor is expected to deliver accurate information and shall not include in the content of the course anything which the instructor knows to constitute libel, invasion of privacy, infringement of copyright or other literary rights, or otherwise violate the legal rights of any persons.

Instructor Support and Training

Instructors shall be provided sufficient development opportunities, training, services, and resources to ensure an effective and efficient distance education teaching and learning environment.  The university shall provide instructional resources to promote structural consistency across course offerings.  This includes providing sample syllabi and course Learning Management System templates.

All faculty and instructional staff providing a distance education course shall be required to complete an online or face-to-face training which will include communication of all applicable federal, state, and university policies which impact distance education courses and instructional technologies and methodologies.  All instructors shall complete this training prior to their first distance education instructional assignment, or as soon as practicable.

Instructor Compensation

Calculation of load for instruction of distance education courses will be conducted in the same manner as face-to-face courses, and seat capacities should remain consistent between face-to-face and distance education offerings.  Full-time faculty may teach online as part of their teaching load, or may be appointed on overload at the applicable pay rate in accordance with established university policy.  Excess enrollment will be considered as an overload, or additional sections with compensation and load reassignment calculated by the same methods used for face-to-face courses.  Instructors may be remunerated for additional effort in serving distance education students as consistent with the particular policies set by the individual department or college and in accordance with established university policy.

Students and Student Support Services

IT Help Desk

Information Technology Service Desk will provide assistance to all distance education students for IT supported technologies.

Online Distance Education Student Orientation

Current information regarding on-campus services will be made available online and accessible to the distance education learner and this information will be provided in an online student orientation provided for each registered distance learner.  This orientation is designed to familiarize new and prospective students with the online learning environment.

Evaluation of Academic and Support Services for Distance Education Students

The university will regularly evaluate the effectiveness of the academic and support services provided to students in online courses and the results will be used for improvement.  Evaluations will examine the scheduling of support services, effectiveness of online orientation, advising, and learning resources.

VERIFICATION of STUDENT IDENTITY in DISTANCE EDUCATION (9-12-2016)

Policy

The purpose of this policy is to ensure that the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point is in compliance with the provisions of the United States Federal Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA), Public Law 110-315 concerning the verification of student identity in distance learning.

All credit-bearing courses and programs offered through distance learning methods must verify that the student who registers for a distance education course or program is the same student who participates in and completes the course or program and receives academic credit. One or more of the following methods must be used:

  1.  A secure login and pass code;
  2.  Proctored examinations; and/or
  3.  New or emerging technologies and practices that are effective in verifying student identification.

All methods of verifying student identity in distance learning must protect the privacy of student information. If any fees associated with the verification of student identity will be charged to students, they must be notified of these charges in writing at the time of registration or enrollment.

Compliance

  1. Secure login and pass code- UW-Stevens Point students are assigned a unique login and password which is used to access university email, courses in the university’s learning management system (LMS), and other secure university technology services. The UWSP Acceptable Use Policy requires that students “protect and not share their password, and/or other authentication credentials”. 
  2. Proctored examinations- UW-Stevens Point is currently doing an analysis of test proctoring procedures and services. 

Links

University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point Password Safety Guidelines
http://www.uwsp.edu/infotech/Pages/Account/Password-Information.aspx

 

SECTION 16 - ACADEMIC SCHEDULING POLICIES

A. Academic Calendar

Each year, an official Academic Calendar for the University is established in compliance with UW System Administration Policy 165 (formerly ACPS-4), Academic Year Definition and Assorted Derivatives; and Regent Policy Document 4-13 Academic Calendar Policy. This process is done in conjunction with the Chancellor, the Office of Academic Affairs, and the Academic Affairs Committee. The academic calendar compliance with U.S. Title IV, federal financial aid regulations is assessed by the Higher Learning Commission. Academic Calendar Requirements are as follows:

  1. Contracting / Employment
  • The academic year (for 9-month contracts) must include 39 contiguous weeks (273 days total); these days include federal and state holidays.
  • Summer session begins after the 9-month contract period ends.
  • Contract periods may not overlap.
  1. Fall and Spring Term Structure
  1. The fall semester cannot begin until September 2nd.
  2. Final exams should not end later than December 22nd for fall semester.
  3. Spring break is usually scheduled after the 8th week in spring semester.
  4. A single week must contain at least 2 meeting days.
  5. Classes that enroll degree seeking undergraduates and graduate students may not begin before the start date of the term nor conclude after the end date of the term.
  6. Classes will utilize the term/session options promulgated by the Office of the Registrar scheduling procedures.
  7. The academic calendar must provide for a five (5) day final exam week for each semester.
  1. Meeting Format
  1. The number of days (instructional minutes) in the two-day and three-day class patterns (e.g., Tues/Thurs or Mon/Wed/Fri) should be reasonably balanced based on procedures promulgated by the Office of the Registrar.
  1. Winterim Session Structure
  1. Must be at least 14 instructional days; use of one or two Saturdays may be required.
  2. A final exam is required within the 14 instructional days of Winterim for each class offered.
  3. No classes greater than 3 credits will be offered during Winterim session (see credit hour definition and policy below).
  1. Summer Term Structure
  1. Must be at least 13 weeks and may be broken into sessions that can be as short as a week in length and as long as 13 weeks depending on credit hour requirements.
  2. Summer term will begin the week following the conclusion of Spring classes.
  3. Session options will be based on scheduling procedures promulgated by the Office of the Registrar.
  4. A final exam is required within the term for each class offered.

B. Credit Hour Definition and Policy

The U.S. Department of Education, Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA), and Program Integrity Regulations provide guidelines and regulations for credit hour policies. The expectation is that accredited institutions must formulate and adhere to a credit hour definition, and create appropriate policies and processes related to the awarding of academic credit that are consistent with commonly accepted standards in higher education.

For the purpose of understanding and calculating credit hours, classroom or direct instructional time is defined as time spent by students acquiring new information through specific lessons or activities developed by the instructor and/or time spent interacting with the instructor. Based upon the guidelines included in this document, departments and/or colleges must determine the appropriate credit hours when planning and scheduling courses.

The sections below provide information on federal, UW System, and UW-Stevens Point credit hour policies. The credit hour standards detailed here apply to all UWSP courses, regardless of mode of instruction (face-to-face, hybrid, online, etc.). While the types of learning activities and instructional strategies will understandably differ among modes of instruction, the expectations regarding direct instructional time (and student time spent in addition to direct instructional activities) are applicable irrespective of the delivery mode.

Federal and UW System Policies:

In 34 CFR 600.2 of the Code of Federal Regulations, a ratio of 1/3 (direct instruction or in-class time) and 2/3 (outside-of-class time) is explicitly discussed and recommended as reasonable practice when calculating credit hours. Likewise, this regulatory language also recognizes institutionally defined flexibility for instruction that takes place in laboratories, internships, studios, and other modes of delivery.

As outlined in UW System Policy 165 (formerly ACPS-4), and reaffirmed in the memo communicating Accreditation Policy Regarding Credit Hours, one (1) credit hour represents an investment of time by the student of not fewer than 48 total hours of course work. Approximately 1/3 of this time (16 hours) is devoted to classroom or direct instruction, and 2/3 of this time (32 hours) is expected to be performed by the student in out-of-class work.

UW-Stevens Point Policy:

One classroom or direct instruction hour equals 50 minutes. Therefore, as described above, when computing student course load, each credit hour represents 50 minutes of classroom or direct instruction each week for one semester (16 weeks, including finals week) and two hours of out-of-class student work time. For example, the following calculation demonstrates the total number of hours required to award of one (1) semester credit hour: (1 hour of direct instruction per week + 2 hours of student independent work time per week) x 16 weeks = 48 hours’ total work effort per semester credit hour.

1. Course Scheduling Policy: Minimum Classroom or Direct Instruction Time

Given the required 16 hours of classroom or direct instruction time per credit hour and the definition that one instructional hour equals 50 minutes, the minimum classroom or direct instructional times are defined in the table below.

Minimum Classroom or Direct Instruction Time Required per Week

 

Credits

Term Length

3 weeks

4 weeks

8 weeks

16 weeks

1

267 min

200 min

100 min

50 min

2

534 min

400 min

200 min

100 min

3

800 min

600 min

300 min

150 min

4

 

800 min

400 min

200 min

5

 

500 min

250 min

 

2. Student Workload Calculations

For the purpose of calculating and understanding student workloads, the following explanation is helpful.

  1. A typical 1.0 credit course = 48 total hours of student workload
  2. A typical semester total credit load for students = 15 credits (to complete 120 credits in four years)
  3. A typical 15 credit load = 720 hours of student workload devoted over the span of one semester (16 weeks)
  4. Completing 720 hours over five (5) days per week = 9 hours of student effort devoted to all courses per day
  5. Students are permitted to take up to 17 credits per semester without special permission, and this provides a defined value for the maximum student workload permitted for a semester.
  6. At 17 credits per semester, the maximum student workload is 10.2 hours per day. This value represents the calculated maximum daily sustained student workload permissible, and this value in turn dictates the minimum calendar meeting days required when scheduling courses.

3. Course Scheduling Policy: Minimum Calendar Days

  1. When scheduling individual courses, the minimum required meeting days must be achieved.
  2. Given that 10.2 hours per day is the calculated maximum sustainable student effort, the minimum calendar days for courses from 1-5 credits are provided below.

i. 1.0 credit = 48 hours = 4.71 days (approx. 1 week)

ii. 2.0 credits = 96 hours = 9.42 days (approx. 2 weeks)

iii. 3.0 credits = 144 hours = 14.12 days (approx. 3 weeks)

iv. 4.0 credits = 192 hours = 18.82 days (approx. 4 weeks)

v. 5.0 credits = 240 hours = 22.22 days (approx. 5 weeks)

  1. The minimum number of scheduled days necessary for offering a one credit course is five. Requests for exceptions to this policy should be directed to the provost. However, exceptions cannot be granted for courses where the minimum number of days of effort cannot be attained for the credits to be awarded.

 

Section 17 - Digital Badging

General Information

Digital Badges are online representation of skills learned by students, typically with visual iconography. They require standardized criteria for attainment and are often linked to artifacts for evidence of attainment. Digital badges can be used as a learning tool for differentiation and independent learning in a course, or as a credential or certification of attainment of program or course outcomes.

Policy for use at UWSP

Digital Badges will not be owned or operated by UW-Stevens Point as an institutional endorsement or credential. Faculty and staff may utilize digital badging within individual courses or curricula at their department or program’s discretion. Digital Badges offered in individual courses or departmental curricula do not represent UW-Stevens Point sanctioned credentials and the university logo cannot be used.

 

Section 18 - Policy Governing  Instructor-Authored Materials Assigned for Text Rental or Student Purchase

  1. Guiding Principles
  1. Textbook adoption should be the decision of each instructor and department, given constraints imposed by the text rental policy (see Chapter 5, Section 1 of this Handbook), and all instructor-authored texts must comply with text rental policies.
  2. AAUP guidelines and UWSP guidelines on Academic Freedom in UWSP Chapter 5, Section 4, protect the instructor’s discretion in choosing texts based on content and subject matter, pedagogical concerns, and other issues related to academic freedom in the classroom.

  3. UWSP is a community of learners and scholars.  The university classroom provides a unique opportunity for students to learn directly from experts in the fields of study offered at UWSP.  A blanket prohibition on the use of instructor-authored course materials would deny this unique learning opportunity to UWSP’s students.

  4. UWSP values peer-reviewed research leading to publication, including instructor-authored materials that are subject to peer review and are distributed to a wide audience.

  5. Instructors should take reasonable steps to avoid the possibility there is even a perception that course materials are adopted for reasons other than pedagogical value.  This is acutely important when the instructor stands to gain financially.

  1. Perceptions, Values, and Ethical Considerations
  1. Required purchase of instructor-authored materials that are used only on the UWSP campus

    When a UWSP instructor authors a textbook or creates course materials, ethical concerns are heightened when the materials are used only on the UWSP campus, and students are required to purchase them, or they are purchased through UWSP Text Rental.  This is based on several reasons, some of which are articulated here:
  1. The perception (or reality) that a UWSP course provides a “captive audience” of students that an instructor is exploiting for financial gain;
  2. The possibility that the text has not gone through a rigorous peer-review process; 
  3. The possibility that a lack of peer review raises questions about the accuracy and currency of the materials authored by the instructor; and
  4. The risk of violating state conflict of interest laws.

Therefore, two concerns are especially pertinent for UWSP instructor-authored texts that will be used only on the UWSP campus:

  1. The intellectual rigor, veracity, suitability, and reliability of these materials might not be established through peer review.
  2. The instructor author might financially gain from the use of the assigned materials.

For texts that are authored by a UWSP instructor and adopted for use only on the UWSP campus, answers to the following questions help to evaluate ethical concerns:

  1. Did the text go through a peer review process?  If so, is there evidence of that?  If not, is there a good reason for not subjecting the text to peer review?
  2. Does the instructor member financially gain from the text?
  3. If so, is the money donated to a UWSP department, foundation entity, student group, or any group or institution associated with UWSP?  Is the money donated to a charity?  Or, does the instructor member keep all or most of the proceeds?
  1. Required purchase of instructor-authored materials that are also utilized at other institutions.

    When a UWSP instructor authors a textbook or creates course materials, and uses the text or materials in UWSP courses, ethical concerns are attenuated when the text is also utilized at other institutions.  This is because:
  1. It is likely that the text has undergone a rigorous peer-review process;
  2. It is likely that the text reflects the most current content in a given subject area;
  3. The adoption by other universities and colleges lessens the risk that a UWSP course will be perceived as a captive audience; and
  4. State conflict of interest laws may be mitigated.
  1. Policy and Approval Process
    When instructor-authored materials are to be assigned for a course, and this assignment requires either student or Text Rental purchase of these materials, the instructional staff member must request and justify the use of materials in the course in a request for approval to the head of the academic unit (i.e., the department chair or associate dean).

    The head of the academic unit shall evaluate the request based primarily upon the academic merit of the materials, but may also consider the values and perceptions articulated in the foregoing sections.  The decision to approve the request should also typically include a consultative step with peers knowledgeable about the use of the materials.  If the head of the academic unit is also involved in the creation and use of these materials, the dean of the college must provide the written approval.

    The approval, if given, will apply to all offerings of the course for which the affected individual is responsible during the twelve-month period following the approval date.

    If the individual wishes to assign the same materials, or other materials created by that individual for courses occurring after the twelve-month period lapses, a new request for approval must be submitted to the head of the academic unit.

    Records of approvals shall be kept in the departmental office, and will be made available upon request of a student, Text Rental personnel, dean, or the provost.